Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
Customary Land & Forest Rights in the Mekong
2 July 2024
South-Eastern Asia
Cambodia
Laos
Myanmar
Vietnam

This webinar will present findings from research conducted by the Mekong Region Land Governance (MRLG) Program and its partners on the recognition and formalization of customary tenure rights across the Mekong region. It will highlight key themes from two important regional publications: "The Recognition and Formalization of Customary Tenure in the Forest Landscapes of the Mekong Region: A Polanyian Perspective" and the "State of Land Brief: Recognition of Customary Tenure in Forest Landscapes of the Mekong Region."

Organizers: 
Land Portal Foundation
Mekong Region Land Governance
19 June 2024
Authors: 
Chris Addison
Global
Congratulations to the Land Portal on their 15th Anniversary. I am so pleased to see the platform go from strength to strength, particularly having seen it rise to the challenge of Covid and keep debate on land issues alive during that time. The incredible skill of the team has been to adjust to the needs of the user community and partners for a focus on land issues. I would like to congratulate the Land Portal director and team, not only for the content that they manage but for the process they use in delivering the services. It is one thing to publish and synthesise information but quite another to maintain an independent platform in the face of emerging new technologies and changing resources. The engine running the Land Portal requires constant development to remain secure, efficient, relevant and cost effective. I know a little of what is involved from the technical platforms I have been involved in running myself. 
4 June 2024
Authors: 
Lilian Lee
Global

After a four-year hiatus, the World Bank Land Conference took place again in Washington, D.C. this May, convening one thousand government, civil society, and land stakeholders in person and thousands more online. The theme of the 2024 conference was "Securing Land Tenure and Access for Climate Action," an exciting and meaningful frame for discussing an issue near to our hearts – open access to land information. 

      
700+
indicators

Statistical data aggregated from trusted providers 
    

        
     66,000+ resources

Searchable library of open access publications   
    

Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities

15th anniversary

LandVoc logo

A controlled vocabulary
and powerful tool
for making data and information
more discoverable.

GeoPortal logo

An easy-to-use tool
for bringing together and visualizing 
statistical and geospatial data 
related to land issues.

Open Up Guide for Land Governance

Open Up
guide for 
Land Governance
    

Countries

Agriculture Valley in Egypt Desert Oasis photo by Darla دارلا Hueske,Flickr,license CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Egypt’s total land area is 995,450 km2 while most of the population lives on less than 5% of the land. Only 3.6% of the land is arable and the remaining 96.4% is dominated by a vast desert plateau. By 2030, Egypt’s growing population will reach nearly 120 million.1. With a growing population and increasing urbanization, the management of land resources has become increasingly complex. Egypt's land governance system is governed by a combination of formal laws, customary practices, and administrative regulations. However, challenges such as informal settlements, and bureaucratic procedures pose significant obstacles to effective land governance. The cultural background related to land tenure is mostly influenced by the Islamic laws2.

With a surface area of 56,790 km², Togo is one of the smallest countries on the African continent. Although land legislation is still influenced by the colonial legacy, one of the distinctive features of the Togolese system is the recognition of customary rights. Unlike other African cities, the inhabitants of the capital Lomé gained access to property very early on. Although Togo has one of the highest rates of agricultural expansion in West Africa, large-scale land acquisitions are a marginal phenomenon and plantation farming remains dominated by smallholders.
-------

Issues

Photo by UNICEF Ethiopia. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

One third of the world’s soils - including farmland, forests, rangelands, and urban land - are already degraded and it is estimated that this number could rise to almost 90% by 2050. Land Degradation occurs naturally, but research shows that land degradation is increasingly caused directly or indirectly by unsustainable human activities, notably deforestation, overgrazing, mining or intensive agriculture. This has driven biodiversity loss, desertification, and led to a significant increase in greenhouse gas emissions.

Land and SDGs

The SDG Land Tracker provides easy access to official data and information on all land-specific SDG indicators. It concisely explains the indicators, why they are important, and tracks progress.

Join the Debate

Events

Data

Library

Share this page