Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Blog Series | Page 6 | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

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Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Land Rights
Authors: 
Yuliya Panfil
Global

On Nov. 13 in Bahrain, the Inter-Agency Expert Group on the Sustainable Development Goal Indicators voted to reclassify SDG Land Indicator 1.4.2 from Tier III to Tier II status.  This is a significant win for the property rights community, and a validation that a coordinated effort from many different players can indeed make a difference.

However, the road there was not easy.

IAEG-SDGs upgrade Indicator 1.4.2 to Tier II Status!!
Global

On 12th November 2017, the 6th meeting of the Inter-agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators (IAEG-SDGs) reached a major decision to reclassify tenure security Indicator 1.4.2 from Tier III to II in Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain. This decision marks the beginning of a global journey to monitor tenure security for all, using comparable land indicators for globally comparable data.

Global

From 11-14 November in Bahrain, decisions are being made that will influence priorities of governments around the world.

In September 2015, at a meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, 193 countries endorsed the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals – known as the SDGs or Global Goals. This collection of 17 ambitious goals and 169 targets form a framework to address the global challenge of eradicating poverty. 

Why indicator 1.4.2 deserves tier II status within the Global SDGs indicators framework.
Global
Salme Village beside the Solu River, on the right is the newly built bridge over the river. It is located in Nuwakot District, Nepal. Asian Development Bank.
Global

By Andy White, Coordinator of the Rights and Resources Initiative

Mama Neema stands at the entrance of her traditional boma (homestead) where she built three houses for her family in Kimokouwa village in Arusha, Tanzania UN WOMEN
Authors: 
Ms. Mary Ndaro
Tanzania

Land in Tanzania is a scarce resource without which life cannot be sustained (FAO, 2007), and it is “increasingly recognized as an important governance issue” around the global (Palmer et al., 2009, p.1).  Hundreds of millions of people including farmers, herders, forest dwellers and agro-industries all rely on land resources for their survival.

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