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Illegal Logging in the Democratic Republic of Congo - Energy, Environment and Resources documents

Reports & Research
Enero, 2014
Democratic Republic of the Congo

 

This paper is part of a broader Chatham House study which assesses illegal logging and the associated trade. The study, which began in 2006, measures the nature and extent of the problem, and the effectiveness of the response by both the government and the private sector in a number of producer, processing and consumer countries.

 

 

Agricultural change, land, and violence in Darfur

Policy Papers & Briefs
Enero, 2014
Central African Republic

Most analyses of violence in Darfur ignore the local dimension of the crisis, focusing instead on the region’s economic and political marginalization and climatic variability. However, agricultural change and other changes relating to the land-rights and land-use systems have led to competition and exclusion, and have played a major role in the collective violence that has raged throughout the region. Understanding these questions is essential for the successful resolution of political and policy debates in Darfur.

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The Case of Climate Change Adaptation in Campeche, Mexico : Uncertain Future, Robust Decisions

Enero, 2014

This documented case of climate change
adaptation in Campeche Mexico grapples with a problem that
is fundamental to addressing climate change risks in areas
of high vulnerability, which is how to reach consensus and
take decisions under an uncertain future. The state of
Campeche in Mexico, is used as an example. With its long
coastline, Campeche is highly vulnerable to current and
projected future climate threats. Two different approaches

Expanding Financing for Biodiversity Conservation : Experiences from Latin America and the Caribbean

Enero, 2014

The Latin America and Caribbean Region
has been at the forefront of global biodiversity
conservation, dedicating 20 percent of its land to protected
areas compared to 13 percent in the rest of the developing
world. This progress has stretched available budgets for
conservation with estimates indicating that a twofold
increase would be necessary to achieve optimal management of
existing protected areas based on 2008 data. Recognizing the

How the world is paving the way for corporate land grabs - Publication - ActionAid

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2013
Global

"For millions of people living in the world’s poorest countries, access to land is a matter not of wealth, but of survival, identity and belonging. Most of the 1.4 billion people earning less than US$1.25 a day live in rural areas and depend largely on agriculture for their livelihoods, while an estimated 2.5 billion people are involved in full- or part-time smallholder agriculture.

Tenure security and demand for land tenure regularization in Nigeria - Publication - IFPRI

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2013
Nigeria

In line with the conventional view that customary land rights impede agricultural development, the traditional tenure system in Nigeria has been perceived to obstruct the achievement of efficient development and agricultural transformation. This led to the Land Use Act (LUA) of 1978.

This Land is Whose Land? Dispossession, Resistance and Reform in the United States

Policy Papers & Briefs
Diciembre, 2013
Northern America

Food First Backgrounder, Spring 2014, Vol. 20, No. 1


Introduction: Land, Race and the Agrarian Crisis


The disastrous effects of widespread land grabbing and land concentration sweeping the globe do not affect all farmers equally. The degree of vulnerability to these threats is highest for smallholders, women and people of color—the ones who grow, harvest, process and prepare most of the world’s food.


Land the New Economic Bubble?

Policy Papers & Briefs
Diciembre, 2013
Global

At the turn of the 21st century, farmland was still considered an investment backwater by most of the financial sector. Although some insurance companies have had farmland holdings for years, most financial investors found farmland, and agricultural investment in general, unappealing compared to the much higher returns to be made in financial markets.


Introduction: Farmland, A Safe Investment in Troubling Financial Times


How UK institutional investors finance the global land grab - Document

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2013
Global

Friends of the Earth’s report, ‘What’s your pension funding? How UK institutional investors finance the global land grab’, highlights the investments of UK institutional investors, such as British Airways Pension Fund, Legal & General and Standard Life, in companies accused of grabbing land, destroying the environment, and undermining sustainable livelihoods.