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Adoption of farmer managed natural regeneration in Senegal. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Senegal
África occidental

Valuable lessons can be learned from smallholder farmers who have successfully protected and regenerated tree cover across agricultural landscapes in Senegal, with minimal reliance on tree nurseries, seedling distribution or tree planting. In the process, they have restored soil fertility to sustainably increase agricultural production.

Restoration of agricultural landscapes and dry forests in Senegal. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Senegal
África occidental

In the above initiatives, self-motivated populations increased food security and reduced vulnerabilities to climatic shocks by restoring and sustainably managing local forest resources. To regenerate agroforestry parklands, farmers built on traditional systems to increase on-farm tree density and convert degraded lands to densely wooded savannas. These actions increased crop yields and produced new sources of livestock browse. The population of Sambandé restored the local forest and managed it to sustainably produce fuel and fruit.

Large-scale regreening in Niger: lessons for policy and practice. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Níger
África occidental

Unless countries can manage to mobilize millions of land users to invest their scarce resources in protecting regenerating trees, the battle against land degradation cannot be won. These experiences from Niger show that hundreds of thousands of smallholder farm families have substantially increased tree cover on their farm land by investing in the management of on-farm trees. This has improved their production systems and their livelihoods. There is no reason to believe that similar success cannot be achieved in many more countries throughout African drylands and sub-humid area.

Climate-smart village approach: communities at the heart of restoration in Senegal. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Senegal
África occidental

The climate-smart village approach created enthusiasm and commitment from farmers in seeking solutions to the problems and constraints that they themselves identified. The approach also involved strengthening the capacity of technical staff to use new tools, and to understand and support the new methods, with complementary finance to support the changes.

Post-project impacts of restoring degraded land in Tahoua, Niger. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Níger
África occidental

When the IFAD-funded project started in 1988, few people could have imagined that 15 years later the degraded plateaus would be covered with trees on land restored to production by individual smallholder farmers. And no one imagined that a village on a barren degraded plateau would one day produce enough vegetables to meet its own needs and produce a surplus for sale, because water levels in the wells had risen so much.

Successful landscape restoration in Abreha We Atsbeha watershed, Tigray, Ethiopia. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Níger
África occidental

Key success factors
There were several reasons for the success of the restoration initiative.
• Implementation had the active participation of the local community; i.e., it was community- led restoration.
• Restoration produced short- and long-term economic and environmental benefits.
• It systematically included women, girls and youth in restoration activities.
• The former village leader had the leadership capacity to mobilize the local community.

History and impacts of dryland restoration in Yatenga, Burkina Faso. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Burkina Faso
África occidental

Since the mid-1980s, the positive impacts of these simple, cost-efficient water harvesting techniques become clear, following their increasingly widespread adoption. Their use has allowed smallholders to reverse land degradation, improve soil fertility, sustainably increase crop production, achieve food security, and create more productive, diverse and resilient farming systems. At the same time, groundwater is recharged, improving access to drinking water for the entire year, and creating opportunities for irrigated vegetable gardening around wells.

Farmers working together to restore their degraded land and diversity production. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Kenya
África occidental

As a farmer in northern Kenya, I came to understand the importance of dryland restoration. After moving to Kaijaido country in the south, I started an initiative to restore the land, increase food security and reduce poverty, supported by a grant from the East African Community with various activities supported by FAO and Yale University.

Two decades of farmer managed natural regeneration on the Seno plain, Mali. Included in Restoring African Drylands

Reports & Research
Diciembre, 2020
Malí
África occidental

The adoption of FMNR increased by 50% over 20 years; about 90% of all farmers now encourage natural regeneration on the land that they manage. The key to success is having local institutions that are respected and effective. The experience in Bankass shows that reforestation rates of at least 250 trees per hectare can be achieved by farmer managed natural regeneration on Sahelian agricultural lands, recreating an agroforestry parkland at a fraction of the cost of establishing conventional plantations.

Strengthening Land Degradation Neutrality data and decision-making through free and open access platforms

Journal Articles & Books
Noviembre, 2020
Global

Land degradation – the reduction or loss of the productive potential of land – is a global challenge. Over 20% of the Earth’s vegetated surface is estimated to be degraded, affecting over 1.3 billion people, with an economic impact of up to US$10.6 trillion. Land degradation reduces agricultural productivity and increases the vulnerability of those areas already at risk of impacts from climate variability and change.

Inception Workshop Report for the GEF-funded Project: Tools4LDN 30-31 October 2019

Journal Articles & Books
Noviembre, 2020
Global

Land degradation – the reduction or loss of the productive potential of land – is a global challenge. Over 20% of the Earth’s vegetated surface is estimated to be degraded, affecting over 1.3 billion people, with an economic impact of up to US$10.6 trillion. Land degradation reduces agricultural productivity and increases the vulnerability of those areas already at risk of impacts from climate variability and change.

Review of Publicly Available Geospatial Datasets and Indicators In Support of Land Degradation Monitoring

Journal Articles & Books
Noviembre, 2020
Global

Land degradation – the reduction or loss of the productive potential of land – is a global challenge. Over 20% of the Earth’s vegetated surface is estimated to be degraded, affecting over 1.3 billion people, with an economic impact of up to US$10.6 trillion. Land degradation reduces agricultural productivity and increases the vulnerability of those areas already at risk of impacts from climate variability and change.