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Community Organizations International Livestock Research Institute
International Livestock Research Institute
International Livestock Research Institute
Acronym
ILRI
University or Research Institution

Location

Vision, mission and strategy

ILRI's strategy 2013-2022 was approved in December 2012. It emerged from a wide processof consultation and engagement.

ILRI envisions... a world where all people have access to enough food and livelihood options to fulfil their potential.

ILRI’s mission is... to improve food and nutritional security and to reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock—ensuring better lives through livestock.

ILRI’s three strategic objectives are:

  1. with partners, to develop, test, adapt and promote science-based practices that—being sustainable and scalable—achieve better lives through livestock.
  2. with partners,to provide compelling scientific evidence in ways that persuade decision-makers—from farms to boardrooms and parliaments—that smarter policies and bigger livestock investments can deliver significant socio-economic, health and environmental dividends to both poor nations and households.
  3. with partners,to increase capacity among ILRI’s key stakeholders to make better use of livestock science and investments for better lives through livestock.

This is ILRI’s second ten-year strategy. It incorporates a number of changes, many based on learning from the previous strategy (2000–2010, initially produced in 2000 and modified in 2002), an interim strategy (2011–2012) and an assessment of the external and internal environments in which the institute operates.

Members:

Resources

Displaying 6 - 10 of 1152

Soil carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from forests and other land use types in an African tropical montane region

Journal Articles & Books
Febrero, 2019

In the last 40 years, large areas of the Mau forest, the largest contiguous tropical montane forest in East Africa, have been cleared for agriculture. To date, there are no empirical data on how this land use change affects carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from soil respiration and soil methane (CH4) fluxes. This study reports measured annual soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes from the native Mau forest and previously forested lands converted to smallholder grazing land, smallholder and commercial tea plantations and eucalyptus plan- tations.

Milk handling practices and consumption behavior among Borana pastoralists in southern Ethiopia

Journal Articles & Books
Febrero, 2019
Ethiopia
Africa
Eastern Africa

Background
Safety and wholesomeness of milk intended for human consumption are influenced by various interlinked factors. However, information on what these factors are, especially in the pastoral traditional communities of Ethiopia, is largely lacking. The objective of this study is to assess the hygienic milk production, processing and consumption practices, and behaviors of Borana pastoralists.

Institutional linkages and landscape governance systems: The case of Mt. Marsabit, Kenya

Journal Articles & Books
Diciembre, 2018
Kenya
Eastern Africa
Africa

The desire to overcome fragmented management of the natural ecosystems on which human beings depend has contributed to a growing interest in landscape approaches and to deeper questions about landscape governance systems. We assessed the emergent governance system that corresponds to the Mt. Marsabit landscape ecosystem in northern Kenya, applying a framework that includes 17 different indicators.

Land use alters dominant water sources and flow paths in tropical montane catchments in East Africa

Journal Articles & Books
Diciembre, 2018
Africa
Eastern Africa

Conversion of natural forest to other land uses could lead to significant changes in catchment hydrology, but the nature of these changes has been insufficiently investigated in tropical montane catchments, especially in Africa. To address this knowledge gap, we identified stream water sources and flow paths in three tropical montane sub-catchments (27–36 km2) with different land use (natural forest, smallholder agriculture and commercial tea plantations) within a 1 021 km2 catchment in the Mau Forest Complex, Kenya.