Mokoro Land Rights In Africa | Page 3 | Land Portal
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Ubicación

The Old Music Hall
106-108 Cowley Road
OX4 1JE Oxford
Reino Unido
GB
Working languages: 
inglés

Mokoro is pleased to host the ’Land Rights in Africa’ site as a contribution to the land rights dialogue and related debates. This website was created in January 2000 by Robin Palmer, and was originally housed by Oxfam GB, where Robin worked as a Land Rights Adviser. A library of resources on land rights in Africa – with a particular focus on women’s land rights and on the impact of land grabbing in Africa – the portal has been well received by practitioners, researchers and policy makers, and has grown considerably over the years. Since 2012, Mokoro has been hosting and maintaining the site.

 

The views expressed on the Land Rights in Africa site as well as the publications hosted there, are those of the authors and do not represent those of Mokoro. Wherever possible, we link to the source website of publications.

Mokoro Land Rights In Africa Resources

Mostrando 11 - 15 de 1119
Library Resource
Octubre, 2021

Presents a framework for tackling urban-rural land challenges. Designed to help a range of stakeholders in developing countries understand how to adopt an inclusive approach to land management and administration initiatives to produce a balance in urban and rural development. Provides structured guidance for addressing land-specific problems within the intersection of urban and rural development. Presents action-oriented steps and recommendations that should be pursued in urban-rural interdependent development.

Library Resource
Octubre, 2021
Uganda

Gives details of how villagers in Chilonga in Zimbabwe’s Masvingo province are being kicked off their land;paving the way for growing lucerne grass as stockfeed. Cites some individual case histories;government support to the giant dairy company Dendairy and attempts to resist the evictions.

Library Resource
Octubre, 2021

Proponents of large-scale agriculture have put forward a multitude of reasons to support the advancement of this approach to farming. Large-scale agriculture is seen as the only way to “modernise” and “develop” the land;to close the yield gap;and to ensure food availability. Furthermore;socio-economic outcomes are assumed to be higher under the management of large-scale farming operations than on small-scale farms. This study reviewed scientific literature on the microeconomic and social effects of large-scale land acquisitions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Library Resource
Septiembre, 2021

A recent study of two Senegalese villages showed how training women on land access is helping them claim their land rights. But disparities in results between locations and the use of customary practices as the preferred way of accessing land highlighted that civil society organisationsstrategies and approaches need to reflect local realities and ensure women from different groups and geographies also benefit.

Library Resource
Septiembre, 2021

Companies in the business of selling farmland to billionaires and pension funds are peddling it as a green;sustainable and socially responsible investment. This propaganda is working. The digital land records and massive quantities of data that big tech companies like Microsoft and Amazon are vacuuming up from farmersfields make it easier for the companies to scour the planet for profitable farmland deals. They can also use satellite technologies and drones to monitor their farms from a distance. But the world’s farmland is finite.

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