Résultats de la recherche | Land Portal

Résultats de la recherche

Showing items 1 through 9 of 39.
  1. Library Resource

    Factors and actors driving the reform agenda

    Articles et Livres
    juillet, 2017
    Asie central, Kazakhstan, Kirghizistan, Tadjikistan, Turkménistan, Mongolie

    This paper examines the roles of the state, international organisations and the public in pastoral land reform in the Central Asian republics and Mongolia. In recent years new legislation has been passed in most of these countries, often driven by environmental concerns. In the development of these laws, international organisations tend to promote common property regimes, whilst governments usually emphasise individual security of tenure, each using environmental arguments taken from quite different bodies of theory.

  2. Library Resource
    New research about gender, land and mining in Mongolia: deepening understanding of coping strategies
    Documents et rapports de conférence
    mars, 2019
    Mongolie

    This paper shares findings from new research on gender and land in a pastoralist community in central- western Mongolia, with a complex structure of investment and operations in gold mining. The paper examines what has been learned from the research about people's coping strategies in the face of social and environmental change, specifically in the context of the development of mining since the transition from socialism and in a relatively isolated area.

  3. Library Resource
    National Report on the Rangeland Health of Mongolia - Second Assessment
    Rapports et recherches
    décembre, 2018
    Mongolie

    As one of the few remaining countries with a robust, nomadic pastoral culture supported by extensive natural rangelands, Mongolia is well positioned to offer sustainable, rangeland-based goods and services to its citizens and to global consumers who place a premium on sustainable products. The primary challenge to sustainable livestock production in Mongolia is that rangeland health, the set of environmental conditions that sustain the productivity and biodiversity of rangelands is in decline in many areas.

  4. Library Resource
    Articles et Livres
    décembre, 2011
    Australie, Bhoutan, Chine, Inde, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, République de Corée, Koweït, Mongolie, Pakistan, Philippines, Thaïlande, Ouzbékistan

    Asia and the Pacific, for the purposes of this book, encompasses a vast territory extending from Mongolia in the north to New Zealand in the south; from the Cook Islands in the east to Kuwait in the west (Map 1). The environmental diversity of Asia and the Pacific is therefore vast, and is contrasted by the region’s coldest and hottest deserts, verdant tropical rainforests, extensive steppe, desert steppe, grassland and rangelands, mountains and plains.

  5. Library Resource
    Articles et Livres
    décembre, 2014
    Éthiopie, Inde, Kenya, Mongolie

    Large-scale land acquisitions have increased in scale and pace due to changes in commodity markets, agricultural investment strategies, land prices, and a range of other policy and market forces. The areas most affected are the global “commons” – lands that local people traditionally use collectively — including much of the world’s forests, wetlands, and rangelands. In some cases land acquisition occurs with environmental objectives in sight – including the setting aside of land as protected areas for biodiversity conservation.

  6. Library Resource

    Volume 10 Issue 2

    Publication évaluée par des pairs
    février, 2021
    Mongolie

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) is a key tool for both environmental and land management. It identifies potential adverse and unintended consequences of the projects on land use and the environment and derives possible mitigation measures to address these impacts. Calculating the volume and severity of impacts is complex and often relies on selections and simplifications. Moreover, calculating impacts associated with nomadic-pastoral (dynamic) land use is still an unresolved methodological problem.

  7. Library Resource

    Volume 9 Issue 12

    Publication évaluée par des pairs
    décembre, 2020
    Mongolie

    Local commons are underutilized in resource management models, thus limiting the effectiveness of the commons concept. This study examined the actual situation of the local commons in Altanbulag soum, a suburb of Ulaanbaatar City, Mongolia, where land degradation is a concern, using the case study method. Interviews using semi-structured questionnaires were conducted with pastoralists. It investigated land use and pastoralists’ relationships to open-access summer pastures, summer camp selection, grazing practice, and acceptance of migrants.

  8. Library Resource
    Land Rights, Mining and Resistance: New Struggles on Mongolia’s Pastoral Commons
    Documents et rapports de conférence
    juillet, 2008
    Mongolie

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union and agricultural decollectivisation, post-socialist rural contexts have afforded commons scholars particularly fertile ground for examination of institutional change and evolution under new modes of governance. In Mongolia, as elsewhere, such transformations have been characterised by the erosion of state influence and de jure and/or de facto devolution of land and resource rights.

  9. Library Resource
    Land Use and Land Tenure in Mongolia: A Brief History and Current Issues
    Documents et rapports de conférence
    janvier, 2006
    Mongolie

    This essay argues that an awareness of the historical relation- ships among land use, land tenure, and the political economy of Mongolia is essential to understanding current pastoral land use patterns and policies in Mongolia. Although pastoral land use patterns have altered over time in response to the changing political economy, mobility and flexibility remain hallmarks of sustainable grazing in this harsh and variable climate, as do the communal use and management of pasturelands.

  10. Library Resource
    Human Impact and Land Degradation in Mongolia
    Publication évaluée par des pairs
    décembre, 2013
    Mongolie

    Climate warming and human actions both have negative impacts on the land cover of Mongolia, and are accelerating land degradation. Anthropogenic factors which intensify the land degradation process include mining, road erosion, overgrazing, agriculture soil erosion, and soil pollution, which all have direct impacts on the environment. In 2009–2010, eroded mining land in Mongolia increased by 3,984.46 ha., with an expansion in surrounding road erosion. By rough estimation, transportation eroded 1.5 million ha. of land.

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