Résultats de la recherche | Land Portal

Résultats de la recherche

Showing items 1 through 9 of 44.
  1. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    janvier, 1998
    Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Global, Asie central, Asie méridionale

    Do women work more or less when countries trade more? Do trade expansion and economic liberalisation affect women and men in different ways'? Case studies from Ghana, Uganda, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Jamaica are used in this report to illustrate some of the gender dimensions relating to trade. Present evidence suggests that, under certain conditions, export expansion can benefit certain groups of younger, more educated women. However in general, the rights of women workers to fair terms and conditions of employment need protection.

  2. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    octobre, 2002
    Slovénie, Liechtenstein, Slovaquie, Hongrie, Croatie, Pologne, Allemagne, Australie, République tchèque, Suisse, Europe orientale

    Women's employment in transition countries, notably Central and Eastern Europe has become increasingly informal and flexible. The first growing trend is that women are more involved in cross-border trade, known as 'suitcase' trade, often keeping women away from home for days or months. They buy mainly consumer and household goods usually unavailable in their home countries, to sell to street vendors on their return home. The second growing trend is women's involvement in sub-contracting, particularly work such as hand sewing for the textile and shoe industries.

  3. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    octobre, 1997
    Global

    How would environmentally sustainable development look if it was gender-sensitive? This report argues that much mainstream literature on environmentally sustainable development has ignored the gender dimensions. Where women have been the target of programmes, they have been seen as natural managers of environmental resources. A gender analysis is important because gender relations affect the ways in which poor men and women manage natural resources.

  4. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    avril, 2003
    Burkina Faso, Tunisie, Sénégal, Afrique occidentale, Asie occidentale, Afrique septentrionale

    Women do 70 per cent of the agricultural work in Senegal, but according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), own only two percent of the land that may be cultivated. Although property laws in countries such as Senegal, Tunisia and Burkina Faso recognise women' s and men's equal rights, and Islam gives women the right to inherit half what men inherit, in practice men retain land ownership. Women are dependent on fathers or husbands for land.

  5. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    janvier, 2006
    Malawi, Afrique australe, Afrique orientale

    Malawi is facing increasing land scarcity and food insecurity for its large rural population and is in the midst of an on-going land policy reform process. This report asks how these reforms may affect women's land rights in a situation of increasing scarcity and competition for land. Reforms include the formalisation of customary land rights as private land rights as a way to ensure tenure security and equitable access to land. It warns that through this approach, women's rights may become increasingly marginalised.

  6. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    mars, 1997
    Océanie

    How are family gender relations affected by extra-household conditions in South Asia' By investigating quantitative factors (e.g. land ownership and income), along with qualitative aspects (e.g. social perceptions, interaction of gender relations in market, community, state and household), this paper shows how these multiple conditions influence the relative bargaining power of different household members. It argues that such understanding is vital for designing policy interventions. Control over land and income increases an individual's bargaining power.

  7. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    janvier, 2003
    Inde, Global, Asie central, Asie méridionale

    One of the greatest barriers to achieving full citizenship rights for women is culture. If development organisations are to help advance women's rights and full citizenship then they must abandon explanations on the basis of ?culture? that ignore gender-based discrimination, and overcome their anxieties about appearing neo-colonial. To do this, effective partnerships between northern-based development institutions and southern-based social movements are necessary since social movements can be a key means of transforming culture.

  8. Library Resource
    Ressources et Outils d'entraînement
    Rapports et recherches
    novembre, 2011
    Global

    Climate change is increasingly being recognised as a global crisis, but responses to it have so far been overly focused on scientific and economic solutions. How then do we move towards more people-centred, gender-aware climate change policies and processes? How do we both respond to the different needs and concerns of women and men and challenge the gender inequalities that mean women are more likely to lose out than men in the face of climate change? This report sets out why it is vital to address the gender dimensions of climate change.

  9. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    août, 2001
    Mozambique, Égypte, Nigéria, Afrique du Sud, Ouganda, Mali, Somalie, Zimbabwe, République-Unie de Tanzanie, Sierra Leone, Asie occidentale, Afrique occidentale, Global, Afrique orientale, Afrique septentrionale, Afrique australe

    Trade liberalisation processes impact differently on men and women due to the fact that men and women have different roles in production. Despite the fact that women are actively involved in international trade, WTO agreements are gender blind and as such have adverse impacts on women. The General Agreement in Trade and Service (GATS), for instance, provides for a level playing field in service provision between big foreign owned companies and small locally owned companies.

  10. Library Resource
    Rapports et recherches
    juillet, 2004
    République-Unie de Tanzanie, Afrique australe, Afrique orientale

    This paper argues that widows and female children in Tanzania have traditionally been denied the right to inherit property from their husbands, even when the property was acquired during the marriage. This is further complicated by a three-part legal system consisting of customary law (law grounded in customs or traditions), Islamic law, and statutory law (law set down by a legislature). As a result, Tanzanian women and their children are often left homeless upon the death of their husbands.

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