International Water Management Institute | Page 5 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
IWMI
Phone number: 
+94-11 2880000

Emplacement

127 Sunil Mawatha Pelawatte, Battaramulla,
Colombo
Sri Lanka
LK
Working languages: 
anglais

The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) is a non-profit, scientific research organization focusing on the sustainable use of water and land resources in developing countries. It is headquartered in Colombo, Sri Lanka, with regional offices across Asia and Africa. IWMI works in partnership with governments, civil society and the private sector to develop scalable agricultural water management solutions that have a real impact on poverty reduction, food security and ecosystem health. IWMI is a member of CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food-secure future.

IWMI’s Mission is to provide evidence-based solutions to sustainably manage water and land resources for food security, people’s livelihoods and the environment.

IWMI’s Vision, as reflected in the Strategy 2014-2018, is ‘a water-secure world’. IWMI targets water and land management challenges faced by poor communities in the developing countries, and through this contributes towards the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of reducing poverty and hunger, and maintaining a sustainable environment. These are also the goals of CGIAR.

IWMI works through collaborative research with many partners in the North and South, and targets policymakers, development agencies, individual farmers and private sector organizations.

 

 

 

International Water Management Institute Resources

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Library Resource
Rapports et recherches
octobre, 2018
Éthiopie

Understanding the gender dimensions of community-based groundwater governance is important because men and women differ in their need for and having access to groundwater, and their participation in the development, management and monitoring of the resource. The leading role played by women in obtaining and safeguarding water is not usually reflected in the institutional arrangements for water management. Addressing this gender inequality could lead to the equal participation of men and women in monitoring and sustainable management of groundwater, and women’s empowerment.

Library Resource

IWMI Research Report 173

octobre, 2018
Kenya

In recent decades;many countries in sub-Saharan Africa have pursued national water permit systems;derived from the colonial era and reinforced by “global best practice.” These systems have proved logistically impossible to manage and have worsened inequality in water access. This study traces the origins of these systems;and describes their implementation and consequences for rural smallholders in Kenya;Malawi;South Africa;Uganda and Zimbabwe.

Library Resource
Rapports et recherches
août, 2018
Éthiopie

This study reviewed the status of natural resources and the driving forces for change, as well as past and ongoing approaches in natural resource management at the watershed scale in Ethiopia. First, we reviewed established environmental policy tools and the legal and policy framework, and determined whether innovative financing mechanisms are working in other areas with a similar context. We undertook stakeholder analyses and mapping to identify key stakeholders, and to assess their possible roles in the implementation of a sustainable financing mechanism for watershed rehabilitation.

Library Resource
Manuels et directives
juin, 2018
Viet Nam, Asie, Asia du sud-est

Participatory land-use planning (PLUP) refers to a bottom-up method of analyzing land and water resources. In its current form, PLUP integrates inputs about climate change and sea level rise to help the community utilize the resources within its vicinities. In utilizing its resources, the community will be able to improve the people’s livelihoods and help them sustain such resources for the benefit of the next generations. This publication in implementing PLUP focused on climate-smart adaptation in Climate-Smart Villages (CSVs).

Library Resource
Documents de politique et mémoires
décembre, 2017

Farmer-led investments in agricultural land and water management (ALWM) are transforming livelihoods and food security across South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Potential exists for even greater benefits, for even more beneficiaries. Understanding what factors influence adoption and impact of ALWM interventions can help ensure sustainable, positive effects of future investments. WLE has designed a suite of tools and investment models to support policy makers and development agents to leverage and extend the investments farmers are already making.

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