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Bibliothèque Non-Technical Pathways as Complements to Reducing Corruption in Land Governance Institutions in Africa

Non-Technical Pathways as Complements to Reducing Corruption in Land Governance Institutions in Africa

Non-Technical Pathways as Complements to Reducing Corruption in Land Governance Institutions in Africa
Vol 3, No 2: May 2020

Resource information

Resource Language
ISBN / Resource ID
AJLPGS:17967
Pages
10

This paper underscores that corruption remains of key concern to land governance institutions in Africa, escalates costs of doing business and therefore undermines investments. Where widespread, land related corruption can grossly undermine tenure security, that it can cause deep discontent and foment social and political insecurity. It therefore needs appropriate responses.Many land governance institutions are in the process of establishing initiatives to respond to corruption. Most of these initiatives are however technology-driven and include digitization of records, establishment of modern land information management systems and e-transactions, among others. The paper argues that such well-meant technology-driven approaches to reduce or eliminate corruption, in circumstances where management and technical staff have poor institutional culture, have poor grounding in professional ethics and commitment, are not enough.The paper therefore suggests that complementary non-technical approaches such as the embedding of ethics in the curricula of Universities and other tertiary training institutions, the use of professional associations to promote adherence to codes of professional conduct by their members, are good options. It also highlights the importance of regulatory boards since they have statutory power to register or de-register practising land professionals. The role of investigatory and prosecution agencies in helping to curb the impunity that pertains in land institutions is also discussed.Ultimately, chief executives have the primary role in helping to inculcate a corruption-free culture in their institutions. They could consider the use tools such as induction courses for newly recruited staff, assessments, refresher courses or the retraining of mid-career management and technical staff to ensure continuous commitment to institutional culture, and the use of service charters, with set targets and timelines for the delivery of the various technical processes.

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Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s)

MWATHANE, IBRAHIM

Geographical focus