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customary land rights

Customary land rights refer to the enjoyment of some use of land that arises through customary, unwritten practice rather than through written codified law.

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Displaying 1 - 12 of 35
24 June 2020
Authors: 
Mr. Berns Komba Lebbie
Miss .Christiana I.B Ellie
Sierra Leone

Under the British colonial rule, Sierra Leone’s land mass was divided into two areas, the colony area and protectorate area. The British government, under the Crown Queen, had direct rule over the land within the capital of Freetown, which was the colony, leaving the provincial lands under the customary rule of chiefs and tribal heads, naming that area as the protectorate region.

How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 April 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzania

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

A Miskito woman in Nicaragua. Photo: Jason Taylor/ILC.
22 April 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Michael Taylor
Global

This is a special Earth Day Op-Ed by Michel Forst, the UN special rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders and Michael Taylor, the Director of the International Land Coalition Secretariat.

Tim Hanstad, President of the Chandler Foundation
10 March 2020
Authors: 
Narayana Gatty
India

India-Land and Development Conference (ILDC) – 2020 held in New Delhi from March 2 to 4 saw a lively debate on a wide range of issues relating to India’s land sector. More than 100 academicians, young researchers, activists and policy makers made their presentations in the conference spread across 34 thematic and two plenary sessions. More than 350 delegates participated in the event. 

Maasai herder on the flooded Mundarara road, northern Tanzania
30 January 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
Africa
Tanzania
Asia
Mongolia
Global

I write this blog as our project team embarks on a fifth year of work on women’s land tenure security (WOLTS) with pastoral communities in mining-affected areas of Mongolia and Tanzania. Just before Christmas 2019, we were in Mundarara village in northern Tanzania. Exceptionally heavy rains made getting around much more challenging than usual. Locals travelling on foot had to make wide detours to avoid getting bogged down in waterlogged grazing land, and it took everyone much longer to get to the village primary school for our long-planned training day. 

5 November 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Elisa Scalise
Ethiopia
Uganda
Peru
Indonesia

Considering that land tenure security is crucial to better outcomes for women it is a surprise that there is not more evidence out there on what works to achieve it.

31 August 2019
Authors: 
Stacey Zammit
Global

Increasingly, governments and citizens in developing countries as well as development agencies are using information technology to improve governance, shape government-citizen relations, and reduce corruption. Despite this, we continue to be at the first phases of understanding how to best use these new data sources in anti-corruption work, as well as appreciating the challenges and limitations inherent in them.  

blockchain, land, survey
16 July 2019
Authors: 
Mr. John Dean Markunas
Global

UNLIKELY PARTNERS: BLOCKCHAIN & LAND SURVEYING INDUSTRY

OUTLINE

I. Introduction to Blockchain Technology

II. Overview of the Surveying Industry

III. Surveying and Blockchain

IV. Types of Blockchains  

V. The Case for Blockchain in the Real Estate Industry

VI. Blockchain, Surveying, Land Registry and Cadastre 

VII. Blockchain Registry Integration Levels

VIII. The Future of Blockchain for Real Estate

IX. Conclusion

APPENDIX 

Glossary — Blockchain Terminology

28 May 2019
Authors: 
Dr. Konrad Hentze
Africa
Mozambique
Zambia
Liberia_landsecurity
20 May 2019
Authors: 
Alfred Brownell
Africa
Liberia

This year's Goldman Environmental Prize winner says the battle for land rights in Liberia is just getting underway.  Alfred Brownell is the recipient of the 2019 Goldman Environmental Prize and founder of Green Advocates an NGO and academic at Northeastern University School of Law

Women activists walk on top of reclaimed land during a protest against land reclamation in Jakarta Bay, Indonesia, in this April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Beawiharta/File
4 December 2018
Authors: 
Dr. Michael Taylor
Fred Nelson
Global

After decades of being the elephant in the room of global development, only now are we seeing increased recognition of land rights

Fred Nelson is executive director of Maliasili and Michael Taylor is director of International Land Coalition 

Land rights have finally been invited to the party - sitting at the intersection of some of the world’s most urgent development, environmental, and human rights priorities.

2 November 2018
Africa

African governments should recognise customary rights to water for millions of small farmers who have been sidelined or "criminalised" by permit systems created during the colonial era, said a report published on Monday.

Restrictive permit systems in Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe have left more than 100 million people without access to enough water, according to the report by the Sri Lanka-based International Water Management Institute (IWMI).

Those countries should "decolonise statutory water law through a hybrid approach", according to the report.

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AAKAR Books (AAKAR)

Established in 1991, AAKAR Books is a publishing company, started publishing quality scholarly books in Social Sciences in English and Hindi since 2001 and is now a niche for itself. Aakar Books is reputed for quality scholarly publishing in the field of Social Sciences.

CCNDNuevoDia

CCCND trabaja junto con las comunidades Ch’orti en la región Nor-oriental de Guatemala. La organización provee apoyo legal y visibilidad a estas comunidades que enfrentan amenazas y violaciones a sus derechos humanos dada la implementación de proyectos hidroeléctricos y mineria en sus territorios.  Su trabajo a contribuido en la recuperación de identidad y gobernanza del territorio chòrti,  así como en la múltiples propuestas para desarrollo de política pública para el acceso a la tierra y la administración del territorio del pueblo Ch òrti`.

SLE

 

Mission

SLE has provided hands-on vocational education and training for future experts and managers in the field of international development cooperation for the last fifty years. They offer postgraduate studies, training courses for international experts, and practice-oriented development research and consultancy to organizations and universities active in this field.

ECDO’s mission is to assist indigenous communities in working for a positive and sustainable change for those deprived of rights and opportunities by implementing both service delivery and rights based approaches. ECDO implements its activities in a fully participatory and bottom-up approach with an emphasis on empowerment from within indigenous communities.

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ISSTE

The IISTE is an IT firm delivering IT supports to education professionals and research institute around world. 

Mission statement of IISTE

“Accelerating Global Knowledge Creation and Sharing”.

In partnership government, community organizations, and education related foundations, IISTE offers a variety of programs and activities to promote education development, international collaboration, including

LAMOSA logo

 

LAMOSA is an independent Community Based Organization (CBO) advocating for land and agrarian rights, and substantive democracy through facilitating sustainable development. 

LAMOSA was established in 1991 to mobilize disposed communities to collectively fight discriminatory colonial and apartheid land laws, racial and gender discrimination and poverty. LAMASO in partnership with the government and Civil Society Organization (CSO) work in four provinces- Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Northwest and Gauteng provinces.

MISSION: To contribute to improved livelihoods through offering a bridge between communities, stakeholders and policy makers in the promotion of equitable access and sustainable management of land and natural resources.

VISION: To become a centre of excellence in promoting the application of appropriate land policies, laws and management practices by empowering society through innovative and knowledge based advocacy and capacity building in Kenya and the region.

LDGI values of Integrity, Trust and Professionalism influence the way we work every day and everywhere.

OUR VISION

Excellent administration and management of land for sustainable development

OUR MISSION

 

To implement an efficient land administration and management system in order to ensure equity in access to land

CORE VALUES

 
  • Efficiency
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  • Rule Of Law
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MOTTO

The Network Movement for Justice and Development (NMJD) is a national human rights-oriented civil society development and advocacy organization that was established in Kenema, eastern Sierra Leone in 1988. It engages in advocacy and strengthens/enhances the capacity of civil society organizations to effectively engage women, men, children, communities, government and other actors for the transformation of society.

The project “Strengthened capacity for improved governance of land tenure and natural resources by local government in partnership with Non State Actors in the Central Highlands of Angola” is an initiative funded by the European Union, and implemented by the NGOs World Vision Angola, and Development Workshop, under the leadership of the Ministério da Administração do Território (MAT), and Provincial and Municipal Governments.

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    • To provide technological education and training and to contribute towards the advancement of society through research and innovation 

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    • Education and training for the real world

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