land inheritance rights related Blog post | Land Portal

land inheritance rights

Legal provisions applying in case of territorial succession.

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National datasets differ on women's land rights because they use different criteria in their calculations.
17 March 2021
Authors: 
Mr. Pranab Choudhury
India

National datasets differ on women's land rights because they use different criteria in their calculations.

Bhubaneswar: There are wide variations in national datasets on women's land ownership in India depending on which agency made the estimate, frustrating efforts to design and implement gender-balanced policies, our analysis shows.

Photo credit: Sandra Coburn for USAID
4 March 2021
Authors: 
Jennifer Duncan
Ethiopia
Malawi
Mozambique
Tanzania
Zambia
Ghana
Liberia
India
Global

Secure land and resource rights are critical for household wellbeing and livelihoods in many developing countries, where land is the principal asset for the rural poor.

Photo credit: Rod Waddington (Flickr)
9 March 2021
Authors: 
Prof. Cheryl Doss
Dr. Joseph Feyertag
Ruth Meinzen-Dick
Global

On the International Women’s Day – and every day – we must call out gender bias wherever we see it. The trouble is, when it comes to land and property rights, much is hidden behind closed doors. But now, a new survey is giving voice to women around the world, letting them share their perceptions of their property rights.

A meeting between IED Afrique, the Mbadakhoune municipal team and local representatives (Photo: copyright Ibrahima Dia/IED Afrique)
8 March 2021
Authors: 
Philippine Sutz
Africa
Tanzania
Ghana
Senegal

Across East and West Africa, IIED and partners have been developing and testing approaches to strengthen women’s voices in local land governance. Philippine Sutz reflects on the role and impact of local governance frameworks as these approaches are implemented in different contexts.

Since 2016, IIED has been working with local partners across East and West Africa to strengthen rural women’s voices in local land governance.

The assumption underpinning this work is that when local women actively participate in land governance, related structures are more likely to recognise and defend women’s interests. This leads to fairer land relations and women having greater control over their livelihood options.

 

In each country where the project has been implemented – Tanzania, Ghana and Senegal – local partners have developed, strengthened or scaled up approaches to support local women to enter the political space and participate meaningfully in local decision-making processes on land allocation and use.

While tailored to address local contexts and needs, the approaches developed in each country share similarities: None of them ‘reinvent the wheel’ but build on existing governance arrangements; they are bottom-up and participatory, involving community dialogue and capacity building exercises; and they all seek to ensure that decision-making bodies on land include a minimum number of active women members and promote local dialogue.

But the approach design was different to recognise the opportunities and gaps associated with each country’s land governance framework.

Tanzania and Ghana: local level governance fosters local ownership

In Tanzania, the law establishes local authorities with power to administer land at the lowest administrative level: the village. The village council and village assembly play a key role in local land governance – they have the power to allocate land and make decisions on land use.

In Ghana, land is governed customarily by traditional authorities, and land governance rules vary from one area to another. In the area where our project was implemented – the Nanton Traditional Area – community chiefs are given power to administer land.

In both countries, the local governance systems enabled our partners to embed their approaches directly at the community level and ensure local ownership.

In Tanzania, the Tanzania Women Lawyers Association (TAWLA) worked directly with village authorities to support the adoption of gender-sensitive village by-laws promoting the participation of women in village level decision-making processes. The process received good support from local communities.

In Ghana, NETRIGHT and the Grassroot Sisterhood Foundation (GSF) worked with local community chiefs – the lowest traditional administrative unit – to establish Community Land Development Committees (CLDCs). These committees are designed to support chiefs in making decisions on land and ensure that such committees had women members.

Senegal: challenges at municipal level

In Senegal, meanwhile, public land is managed by the local governments of municipalities – and community land is allocated at the local level through the municipality. A ‘municipality’ includes between around 30 and 60 villages; this is a higher ‘administrative level’ compared with land governance in Tanzania or Ghana.

The authorities administering land are the municipal council through the land commission – a local body supporting the council’s decision-making process.

Our partner IED Afrique worked in Darou Khoudoss to support the inclusion of women in the land commission and the adoption of a local land charter promoting women’s participation in land governance.

Working at the municipal level – rather than directly in villages – has proved more challenging in terms of local ownership. IED Afrique developed additional activities to ensure buy-in at village level. In particular, they collaborated with local women’ groups to make sure that the project was reaching women in villages.

In Tanzania and Senegal, land being governed by national laws makes it easier to replicate and scale up approaches. In Tanzania, TAWLA was able to reach all 64 villages in the Kisarawe District. Replicating the approach across different regions in Ghana would have meant adapting it to each regional context, which would have been cumbersome and resource intensive.

Takeaways for policymakers

Comparing land governance frameworks (PDF) in the three countries shows how their nature – and in particular the existence (or lack) of heavily decentralised power on land – determines, to a degree, the administrative level where the intervention takes place. This impacts how easily participatory and inclusive bottom-up approaches can be implemented.

Local authorities having power over land at the village or community level – as in Tanzania and Ghana – is a real advantage, as it allows approaches to be embedded in the very communities they’re trying to support. When land is governed at a higher administrative level – as in Senegal – additional efforts and resources are often needed to ensure local ownership of the approach.

In wider terms, my sense is that the more decentralised a land governance framework, the better for democratic, participatory processes to take place and ultimately, for how local women’s voices can be reflected in decisions made on land administration. This should be kept in mind by governments undertaking land governance reforms.


This blog was originally posted  on the IIED website and is the fourth blog in a series looking at ways to strengthen women’s access to and control over land in Africa.

Women gather outside the mosque in Masethele, Bombali District, Sierra Leone.
7 March 2021
Authors: 
Namati Communications
Sierra Leone

When Namati's Community Land Protection project in Sierra Leone's Paki Massabong Chiefdom came to a close, a 'handing over' ceremony was held. Along with village chiefs and local officials, a number of female community members stood to speak. Here are excerpts from what a few of these women shared.  

Photo by 'United Nations Photo' via flickr
23 February 2021
Authors: 
Dr. Joseph Feyertag
Northern Africa
Egypt
Libya
Sudan
Liberia
Jordan
Lebanon
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Syrian Arab Republic
United Arab Emirates
Yemen
Global

Prindex Researcher Joseph Feyertag sets out some key findings from his latest paper 'How perceived tenure security differs between men and women in the MENA region'

It is for good reason that gender is a major theme at this week’s Arab Land Conference. Around just 5% of women own land or property in the region – one of the lowest rates in the world.

 Women’s legal rights and gender gaps in property ownership in developing countries
21 January 2021
Authors: 
Ms. Hema Swaminathan
Isis Gaddis
Rahul Lahoti
Africa
South Africa
Global

On January 24, 2020, a quiet revolution happened in South Africa. In a landmark ruling in the Durban High Court, 72-year old Agnes Sithole scored a legal victory that not only provided her a share of her husband’s estate but may also help to protect an estimated 400,000 black elderly women in South Africa. Facing impoverishment when her marriage ended, Ms.

8 December 2020
Authors: 
Mr. Tim Hanstad
Global

In recent months, supreme courts from India to Nigeria and Zimbabwe have issued historic opinions recognizing and

A group of adults in the hilly highlands of Madagascar, walking from the capital Antananarivo to their rural villages with luggage and children in tow. (Credit: Rijasolo / AFP)
7 October 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Sébastien Boillat
Dr. Julie Zähringer
India
Global

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world abruptly, affecting nearly all of humanity with breath-taking speed.

Foto: Ingrid Ãgohó Pataxó
17 September 2020
Authors: 
Celia Xacriabá
Latin America and the Caribbean
South America
Brazil

We represent around five percent of the population of humanity, but we preserve around eighty-two percent of the world's biodiversity.

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Adecru - Acção Académica Para O Desenvolvimento Das Comunidades Rurai

MISSION

Boost the focus of citizen conscience and sovereign agenda for local development promoting greater involvement and interaction between various national and international actors in favor of solidary and fair development of communities.

 

VISION

Rural Communities more actives in setting up priorities, definition, implementation and evaluation of action for their own development

ResearchConsortium

Launched in 2018, the Research Consortium, by Resource Equity, is a powerful hub for the collection, sharing, and exchange of knowledge on how to effectively advance women’s land rights. We identify gaps in knowledge and help develop a common agenda for research so that learnings can more easily be compared, shared, and applied.

 

Resource Equity

Resource Equity is a women-run and women-centered nonprofit organization that focuses exclusively on legal issues specific to gender equity in land and natural resources around the world.

 

Women's Land Link Africa (WLLA) is a joint regional partnership project that was launched in 2004. The WLLA was founded on the principal that all who are truly dedicated to improving the situation for women's land and housing rights (and to doing so in a manner which is both sustainable and stakeholder-driven) can and must link in complementary ways. The WLLA supports and strengthens linkages between regional stakeholders focused on improving women's access to, control over and ownership of land and housing in Africa. Working in isolation has rarely improved situations.

ABOUT

The Working Group for women and land ownership (WGWLO), is a network of 41 NGOs, CBOs and individuals in Gujarat, working on the issue of agriculture land ownership from livelihood, security, rights and empowerment angle for women. These are CBOs and NGOs spread in more than 15 districts of Gujarat, working at the rural grass roots level since 2003.

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