matrilineal lineage related Blog post | Land Portal
There are 26 content items related to matrilineal lineage on the Land Portal.

matrilineal lineage

A matrilineal lineage group is one where the line of descent and membership is transmitted by the female.

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Photo: UN Women/Ryan Brown
3 June 2022
Authors: 
Maaike van den Berg
Mr. Neil Sorensen
Global

For land governance interventions to be equitable and sustainable, the role of women must be actively brought to the forefront. But, how do you do this? How do you measure this? These are questions posed within the LAND-at-scale program. 

26 May 2022
Authors: 
Miss Olipa Katongo Kunda
Zambia

Just like many African countries, a majority of Zambian tribes follow a matrilineal system, that is, an affinity system in which descent is derived through maternal instead of paternal lines which essentially means children are recognised by the names or family of their mothers. This does not only affect decent but also involves the inheritance of titles and property including land through the female line. One might ask why women have less access and control of land in Zambia when land and property is inherited through maternal lines.

 

Agro land
3 December 2021
Authors: 
Ms. Khadija Mrisho
Africa
Global

In Africa women play an integral role in the continent’s agriculture sector, representing up to 60 percent of the agricultural labour force in some countries. In Tanzania, agriculture accounts for the largest share of employment, more than 80 percent of women are engaging in agricultural activities and subsequently contributing to the country’s food requirements.

USAID supported traditional leaders to participate in a series of dialogues to spark action to shift gender norms that hinder women’s land rights in Zambia (Photo: copyright Howard Mang'wato)
1 July 2021
Authors: 
Patricia Malasha
Africa
Zambia

Across much of Africa, land is not allocated and inherited under statutory law but through customary practices rooted in kinship. In patrilineal systems, land belongs to men’s families and is inherited through the paternal line.

In Zambia, many ethnic groups follow a matrilineal system, where women own land and pass it down the maternal line.

Policy Seminar: Crafting the Next Generation of CGIAR Gender Research
7 January 2020
Authors: 
Evgeniya Anisimova
Global

A recent policy seminar at IFPRI presented an upcoming CGIAR publication on the topic  

The Land Portal at CFS 46
15 November 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Laura Meggiolaro
Kenya
Brazil
Global

At CFS 46, the Land Portal had the opportunity to be the co-organizer of the side event How the VGGT have changed rural women’s lives:  Key strategies and innovations towards gender equality together with GLTN Unit UN-Habitat, the Cadasta Foundation and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). This side event brought together a range of experts who illustrated efforts aimed at ensuring women’s land rights through both formal institutions and customary systems.

Why Women Farmers Deserve the Right to Identity
18 October 2019
Authors: 
Shipra Deo
Kenya
China
Myanmar
Bangladesh

On the 2019 International Day of Rural Women, Landesa’s Shipra Deo explores how land rights are an essential element for overturning misperceptions about the role of women in society and on the farm.

In a workshop with a group of agronomists who work in agriculture extension in India, I ask the participants to draw the picture of a farmer with whom they work. All but one of them draw male figures.

Fatuma, an agricultural laborer in Tanzania, is among the millions of women worldwide who work on land but don’t own land of their own.
18 October 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Karol Boudreaux
Global

In rural areas around the world, the face of a farmer is increasingly a woman’s.

From the paddy terraces of Asia to the maize fields of sub-Saharan Africa, she will till, plant, water, and harvest crops that feed her household and whole communities.

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