mining related Blog post | Land Portal
There are 906 content items related to mining on the Land Portal.

mining

The process or business of extracting ore or minerals from the ground.
 

Source: answers.com

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Displaying 1 - 12 of 24
28 April 2022
Authors: 
Dr. Rick de Satge
South Africa

This Land Portal data story explores the history of double dispossession in South Africa, from the colonial and apartheid era until contemporary times due to mining investments.

 

 

Forest transition Aerial view of a Transition Forest area in Bokito, Cameroon. Photo by Mokhamad Edliadi/CIFOR
29 March 2022
Authors: 
Amaelle Seigneret
Nathaniah Jacobs
Eastern Africa
Ethiopia
Tanzania
Southern Africa
South Africa
Global

New Geographies of Climate Vulnerability
3 August 2021
Peru
Mongolia
Global

Mining in the context of climate of climate change brings new challenges to the industry and exacerbates already existing sustainability problems. This Datastory highlights some of these tensions while pointing towards emerging best practice. The findings are based on document analysis and semi-structure structured interviews with corporate representatives from the 37 largest mining companies in the world.

 

 

 

Daw Nang Nwe stands on dirt road outside her shop
30 July 2021
Authors: 
Namati Communications
Myanmar

No one asked them. No one even informed them. The first indicator the villagers had that something was happening in the Ar Yel Mountains was the arrival of men in construction hats.

At the beginning the disturbance was minimal; it was only one or two companies undertaking site explorations and tests. But by 2014, eight companies were “tearing the mountains apart” in their quest for manganese dioxide. That, said the villagers, was when the problems really began.

Indigenous people's lives depend on their lands, but threats are growing worldwide
12 May 2021
Guatemala
Brazil
Indonesia
Bangladesh

This blog was written by Barbara Fraser and published by EarthBeat at: https://www.ncronline.org/news/earthbeat/indigenous-peoples-lives-depend-their-lands-threats-are-growing-worldwide

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WOLTS Gender Guidelines - Mokoro, PCC and ALAMGAC Land Use Planning Collaboration
30 March 2021
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
J. Batsaikhan
Lkhamdulam Natsagdorj
Mongolia
Global

 

Pilot study supports national roll-out of participatory land use planning

 

Sound, sustainable land management is critical to the long-term viability of Mongolia’s traditional herding way of life. And careful planning at local level, in a participatory and gender-inclusive way, is needed to underpin that.

 

Tungsten surface mining in Rwanda
29 January 2021
Authors: 
Nathaniah Jacobs
Tehtena Mebratu-Tsegaye
Global
Foto: Ingrid Ãgohó Pataxó
17 September 2020
Authors: 
Celia Xacriabá
Latin America and the Caribbean
South America
Brazil

We represent around five percent of the population of humanity, but we preserve around eighty-two percent of the world's biodiversity.

29 June 2020
Authors: 
Jeet Singh
India

The land use change has been recognized as a major factor associated with the emergence of zoonotic diseases (diseases transmitted from animals) such as COVID-19. Various documentations on zoonotic outbreaks worldwide have found that the richness of the biodiversity works as a buffer against transmission of zoonotic diseases[1]. Many scientific studies across the globe have found that the increased anthropogenic activities have resulted in the loss of biodiversity. It further led to the destruction of wildlife habitat.

How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 April 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzania

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

Blogs

Events

Organizations

AZMEC is the Association of Zambian Mineral Exploration Companies.

The aims and objectives of AZMEC are to provide a discussion forum and dedicated lobby group for mineral exploration companies and mining companies carrying out exploration as well as government representatives, NGO’s, service providers, academic institutions and other interested parties in Zambia with the view to contributing to the growth, promotion, and sustainable development of the sector in this country.

ICMM is an international organisation dedicated to a safe, fair and sustainable mining and metals industry. Bringing together 26 mining and metals companies and 35 regional and commodities associations we strengthen environmental and social performance. We serve as a catalyst for change; enhancing mining’s contribution to society.

International Women and Mining Network - RIMM - LOGO

The mission of International Women and Mining Network - RIMM is to make visible the serious problems of women in mining across countries, governments, NGO’s, human rights groups, trade unions, mining struggle groups and communities and others concerned with the exploitation of women in mining and to stand as a strong global platform to fight for women’s rights and gender justice vis-a-vis mining.

IPIECA develops, shares and promotes good practice and knowledge to help the industry and improve its environmental and social performance. We do this with the understanding that the issues that dominate the sustainable development agenda – climate and energy, environmental and social issues – are too big for individual companies to tackle alone. The industry must work together to achieve improvements that have real impact. IPIECA helps to achieve this goal. 

KDNG is a network of Kachin civil society groups and development organizations inside Kachin State and abroad. It was in September 2004.

KDNG promotes the formation of a healthy civil society based on equality and justice for local people. It works to document the military government's exploitation of natural resources, collecting information large scale development including mining, mono crop plantation and hydropower.

London Mining Network (LMN) is an alliance of human rights, development, environmental and solidarity groups.

We work for

  • human rights, including the rights of Indigenous Peoples and workers, and
  • sustainable development (development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs in communities around the world affected by the activities of mining companies based in or funded from London

We do this by

MISIÓN:

Diseñar, ejecutar y evaluar políticas públicas de minería, orientadas a elevar y difundir la contribución del sector minero al desarrollo nacional, fomentando la innovación, productividad y la sustentabilidad, a objeto de aprovechar los recursos mineros disponibles en condiciones socialmente inclusivas.

VISIÓN:

Ser el principal actor y articulador de las políticas públicas de minería en Chile y ser reconocido por contribuir a la valoración y difusión del aporte del sector al desarrollo del país.

Naya Sawera Vikas Kendra (NSVK) has been working towards the empowerment of the poor and the marginalized since 1999. It has been effectively working to uplift the conditions of the denied and the deprived. NSVK has initiated several interventions to meet the changing socio-economic and political context and be relevant and working directly with the communities through the CBOs and their networks.

 

Our Vision:

To establish an egalitarian and non-exploitative “Sarvodaya” social order that will promote and uphold justice and economic self-reliance.

The Oxpeckers Center for Investigative Environmental Journalism is Africa’s first journalistic investigation unit focusing on environmental issues. The Oxpeckers #MineAlert enables the  tracking and sharing of mining applications and licences and provides analytic reporting on mining and land related issues. The Center combines traditional investigative reporting with data analysis and geo-mapping tools to expose eco-offences and track organised criminal syndicates.

POINT (Promotion of Indigenous and Nature Together) was established in March 2012. It is started as a response to the lack of organization led by “Indigenous Peoples” working for Indigenous Peoples’ issues in Myanmar. In the past, only the religious organizations are the strong civil society working for its related indigenous people’s needs of humanitarian and development assistance to some extent. Therefore, the organization POINT was formed in order to fill the gap of promoting the rights of indigenous peoples along with increased awareness on environmental related knowledge.

We operate with pioneering spirit

Our long history is filled with firsts. We have developed some of the world’s largest and best quality mines and operations, and our people work in around 35 countries across six continents. We’ve led the industry in partnerships, with customers in new markets, and with local communities. We’ve pioneered technological innovations, such as our Mine of the Future™ programme and our low-CO2 aluminium from hydropower. And we’ve paved the way in areas such as safety, tax transparency and legacy management.

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