Land & Gender related Blog post | Land Portal
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National datasets differ on women's land rights because they use different criteria in their calculations.
17 March 2021
Authors: 
Mr. Pranab Choudhury
India

National datasets differ on women's land rights because they use different criteria in their calculations.


Bhubaneswar: There are wide variations in national datasets on women's land ownership in India depending on which agency made the estimate, frustrating efforts to design and implement gender-balanced policies, our analysis shows.


Photo credit: Sandra Coburn for USAID
4 March 2021
Authors: 
Jennifer Duncan
Ethiopia
Malawi
Mozambique
Tanzania
Zambia
Ghana
Liberia
India
Global

Secure land and resource rights are critical for household wellbeing and livelihoods in many developing countries, where land is the principal asset for the rural poor.

Photo credit: Rod Waddington (Flickr)
9 March 2021
Authors: 
Prof. Cheryl Doss
Dr. Joseph Feyertag
Ruth Meinzen-Dick
Global

On the International Women’s Day – and every day – we must call out gender bias wherever we see it. The trouble is, when it comes to land and property rights, much is hidden behind closed doors. But now, a new survey is giving voice to women around the world, letting them share their perceptions of their property rights.


A meeting between IED Afrique, the Mbadakhoune municipal team and local representatives (Photo: copyright Ibrahima Dia/IED Afrique)
8 March 2021
Authors: 
Philippine Sutz
Africa
Tanzania
Ghana
Senegal

Across East and West Africa, IIED and partners have been developing and testing approaches to strengthen women’s voices in local land governance. Philippine Sutz reflects on the role and impact of local governance frameworks as these approaches are implemented in different contexts.


Since 2016, IIED has been working with local partners across East and West Africa to strengthen rural women’s voices in local land governance.


The assumption underpinning this work is that when local women actively participate in land governance, related structures are more likely to recognise and defend women’s interests. This leads to fairer land relations and women having greater control over their livelihood options.


 


In each country where the project has been implemented – Tanzania, Ghana and Senegal – local partners have developed, strengthened or scaled up approaches to support local women to enter the political space and participate meaningfully in local decision-making processes on land allocation and use.


While tailored to address local contexts and needs, the approaches developed in each country share similarities: None of them ‘reinvent the wheel’ but build on existing governance arrangements; they are bottom-up and participatory, involving community dialogue and capacity building exercises; and they all seek to ensure that decision-making bodies on land include a minimum number of active women members and promote local dialogue.


But the approach design was different to recognise the opportunities and gaps associated with each country’s land governance framework.


Tanzania and Ghana: local level governance fosters local ownership


In Tanzania, the law establishes local authorities with power to administer land at the lowest administrative level: the village. The village council and village assembly play a key role in local land governance – they have the power to allocate land and make decisions on land use.


In Ghana, land is governed customarily by traditional authorities, and land governance rules vary from one area to another. In the area where our project was implemented – the Nanton Traditional Area – community chiefs are given power to administer land.


In both countries, the local governance systems enabled our partners to embed their approaches directly at the community level and ensure local ownership.


In Tanzania, the Tanzania Women Lawyers Association (TAWLA) worked directly with village authorities to support the adoption of gender-sensitive village by-laws promoting the participation of women in village level decision-making processes. The process received good support from local communities.


In Ghana, NETRIGHT and the Grassroot Sisterhood Foundation (GSF) worked with local community chiefs – the lowest traditional administrative unit – to establish Community Land Development Committees (CLDCs). These committees are designed to support chiefs in making decisions on land and ensure that such committees had women members.


Senegal: challenges at municipal level


In Senegal, meanwhile, public land is managed by the local governments of municipalities – and community land is allocated at the local level through the municipality. A ‘municipality’ includes between around 30 and 60 villages; this is a higher ‘administrative level’ compared with land governance in Tanzania or Ghana.


The authorities administering land are the municipal council through the land commission – a local body supporting the council’s decision-making process.


Our partner IED Afrique worked in Darou Khoudoss to support the inclusion of women in the land commission and the adoption of a local land charter promoting women’s participation in land governance.


Working at the municipal level – rather than directly in villages – has proved more challenging in terms of local ownership. IED Afrique developed additional activities to ensure buy-in at village level. In particular, they collaborated with local women’ groups to make sure that the project was reaching women in villages.


In Tanzania and Senegal, land being governed by national laws makes it easier to replicate and scale up approaches. In Tanzania, TAWLA was able to reach all 64 villages in the Kisarawe District. Replicating the approach across different regions in Ghana would have meant adapting it to each regional context, which would have been cumbersome and resource intensive.


Takeaways for policymakers


Comparing land governance frameworks (PDF) in the three countries shows how their nature – and in particular the existence (or lack) of heavily decentralised power on land – determines, to a degree, the administrative level where the intervention takes place. This impacts how easily participatory and inclusive bottom-up approaches can be implemented.


Local authorities having power over land at the village or community level – as in Tanzania and Ghana – is a real advantage, as it allows approaches to be embedded in the very communities they’re trying to support. When land is governed at a higher administrative level – as in Senegal – additional efforts and resources are often needed to ensure local ownership of the approach.


In wider terms, my sense is that the more decentralised a land governance framework, the better for democratic, participatory processes to take place and ultimately, for how local women’s voices can be reflected in decisions made on land administration. This should be kept in mind by governments undertaking land governance reforms.



This blog was originally posted  on the IIED website and is the fourth blog in a series looking at ways to strengthen women’s access to and control over land in Africa.

Women gather outside the mosque in Masethele, Bombali District, Sierra Leone.
7 March 2021
Authors: 
Namati Communications
Sierra Leone

When Namati's Community Land Protection project in Sierra Leone's Paki Massabong Chiefdom came to a close, a 'handing over' ceremony was held. Along with village chiefs and local officials, a number of female community members stood to speak. Here are excerpts from what a few of these women shared.  

Photo by 'United Nations Photo' via flickr
23 February 2021
Authors: 
Dr. Joseph Feyertag
Northern Africa
Egypt
Libya
Sudan
Liberia
Jordan
Lebanon
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Syrian Arab Republic
United Arab Emirates
Yemen
Global

Prindex Researcher Joseph Feyertag sets out some key findings from his latest paper 'How perceived tenure security differs between men and women in the MENA region'


It is for good reason that gender is a major theme at this week’s Arab Land Conference. Around just 5% of women own land or property in the region – one of the lowest rates in the world.


22 February 2021
Authors: 
Miss Olipa Katongo Kunda
Sub-Saharan Africa
Zambia

When a woman has legal access to and control over land and its profits, she improves her own life and that of her family.  In order for this to happen, equitable laws, policies, systems and customs that promote and support women’s land ownership must be put into effect.

Depositphotos/ Svetlana
22 February 2021
Authors: 
Shahd Mustafa
Northern Africa

From revolution and conflict to shifting demographics and women’s empowerment – big change is underway in the Arab world, much of it linked to questions of land. Perceptions data is a quick and effective way to understand the impact this change is having and map a smart way forward that meets the needs of people today.

Biden administration: How can women benefit from land technology?
20 January 2021
Authors: 
Yuliya Panfil
Ms. Ailey Kaiser Hughes
Stephanie Sampson
Rwanda
Tanzania
Uganda
South Africa
United States of America

Land technology is moving at warp speed. How will the Biden administration and Samantha Power ensure women benefit?

Shanti Tamang works in a field in Besisahar, Pashchimanchal, Nepal. CIFOR/Mokhamad Edliadi
28 January 2021
Authors: 
Julie Mollins
Global

Forest tenure reform in the global south has often failed to be gender-responsive, but there is increasing interest in taking up this challenge to activate effective change.


Now, a new guide created by scientists with the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) aims to make the process more accessible, recommending a three-step process, billed as “analyze, strategize, and realize,” to support interventions in local and national contexts.


 Women’s legal rights and gender gaps in property ownership in developing countries
21 January 2021
Authors: 
Ms. Hema Swaminathan
Isis Gaddis
Rahul Lahoti
Africa
South Africa
Global

On January 24, 2020, a quiet revolution happened in South Africa. In a landmark ruling in the Durban High Court, 72-year old Agnes Sithole scored a legal victory that not only provided her a share of her husband’s estate but may also help to protect an estimated 400,000 black elderly women in South Africa. Facing impoverishment when her marriage ended, Ms.

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APqc

Em meados dos 70, pesquisadores científicos dos institutos de pesquisa ligados ás secretarias de Estado da Agricultura, Méio Ambiente e Saúde reuniram-se no auditório do Instituto Biológico, em São Paulo, com o objetivo de fundar a sua Associação de classe. Após inúmeros encontros, em 2 de Agosto de 1977 foi criada a Associação de Pesquisadores Científicos do Estado de São Paulo (APqc), tendo como objetivos a divulgação, o fortalecimento e a defesa dos institutos públicos de pesquisa paulistas, das atividades de pesquisa e de pesquisadores científicos ativos e inativos. 

CNPQ

O CNPq foi criado pela Lei nº 1.310, de 15 de janeiro de 1951, com a denominação de Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas. Na ocasião, o art. 1º, §1º dessa lei atribuiu ao conselho personalidade jurídica própria e o subordinou diretamente à Presidência da República. Posteriormente, a Lei nº 6.129, de 6 de novembro de 1974 transformou o Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas no atual Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico e reformulou sua configuração jurídica, atribuindo-o personalidade jurídica de direito privado, sob a forma de fundação.

Adecru - Acção Académica Para O Desenvolvimento Das Comunidades Rurai

MISSION

Boost the focus of citizen conscience and sovereign agenda for local development promoting greater involvement and interaction between various national and international actors in favor of solidary and fair development of communities.

 

VISION

Rural Communities more actives in setting up priorities, definition, implementation and evaluation of action for their own development

Organização internacional que trabalha por justiça social, igualdade de gênero e pelo fim da pobreza. Fomos fundados em 1972 e estamos presentes em 45 países, alcançando mais de 15 milhões de pessoas no mundo. No Brasil desde 1999, atuamos em mais de 2.4 mil comunidades e beneficiamos mais de 300 mil pessoas. Trabalhamos em parceria com comunidades e organizações locais em projetos de educação, agroecologia e clima, igualdade de gênero e participação e democracia.


Afesis-corplan

Our vision is of a self-reliant society in which people have equitable access to resources and institutions are an expression of people’s needs and aspirations.


Our mission is to support civic agency through catalytic interventions aimed at achieving systemic change in good local governance and sustainable human settlement development.

Afghanistan Women Council

Afghanistan Women Council (AWC) is a non-governmental, non-political, non-profit, non-sectarian Charity Organization founded in 1986 by the efforts of Ms. Fatana Ishaq Gailani and a group of Afghan women with an aim to assist Afghan women and children. The predominant objective of the organization is to enlighten women, improve their living conditions and strengthen their socio-economic status in society by their multi-lateral involvement in development activities. AWC is registered with the Government of Pakistan and Afghanistan as a charity NGO.

Afghanistan’s Women’s Network

After the United Nation Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, China, where a group of women from various organizations and agencies of the United Nation participated; the theory to form a network for the Afghan women's cooperation and integration developed. With inspire from women's movement in different part of the world; finally, in 1995 participants (women) of the conference decided to establish Afghan Women Network (AWN).


A AS-PTA – Agricultura Familiar e Agroecologia é uma associação de direito civil sem fins lucrativos que, desde 1983, atua para o fortalecimento da agricultura familiar e a promoção do desenvolvimento rural sustentável no Brasil. A experiência acumulada pela entidade ao longo desses anos permitiu comprovar a contribuição do enfoque agroecológico para o enfrentamento dos grandes desafios da sustentabilidade agrícola pelas famílias agricultoras. A AS-PTA participou da constituição e atua em diversas redes da sociedade civil voltadas para a promoção do desenvolvimento rural sustentável.

The All-China Women's Federation (ACWF) was founded on April 3, 1949. It is a mass organization that unites Chinese women of all ethnic groups and from all walks of life, and strives for their liberation and development. The mission of ACWF is to represent and uphold women's rights and interests, and to promote equality between women and men.

AU

American University creates meaningful change in the world. With highly ranked schools and colleges and internationally recognized faculty, AU offers a balance between class time and career-advancing experience in Washington, DC, and beyond. Its students, among the country’s most politically active, distinguish themselves for their service, leadership, and ability to rethink global and domestic challenges and opportunities.

Anuario Antropologico

Anuário Antropológico (Anuário Antropológico)

Anuário Antropológico é uma revista semestral do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Antropologia Social da Universidade de Brasília (PPGAS/UnB). Publica artigos originais, ensaios bibliográficos, resenhas, críticas e outros textos de natureza acadêmica que apresentem pesquisas empíricas de qualidade, diálogos teóricos relevantes e perspectivas analíticas diversas. A Revista publica textos em português, inglês, espanhol ou francês.Os artigos selecionados pela comissão editorial são submetidos a pareceristas externos em regime de anonimato.

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