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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2014
Southern Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa
Africa
Malawi

Years of continuous cultivation with little or no use of external inputs to restore soil nutrients has resulted in a situation in which crop production in a number of African countries is now limited by nutrient deficiencies – nitrogen, in particular, which is crucial to healthy plant growth. This widespread problem has been described as a “nitrogen drought”.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2014
South Africa
Southern Africa

Land is the basic resource that is needed by man in order to survive: It provides humans with living space, nutrition and energy resources. The rapid growth of the human population, climate change and pollution on a catastrophic scale has caused the quality of land resources to be compromised.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2014
South Africa
Zimbabwe
Mozambique
Africa
Southern Africa

This article offers an approach to the study of the evolution, spread and uptake of integrated water resources management (IWRM). Specifically, it looks at the flow of IWRM as an idea in international and national fora, its translation and adoption into national contexts, and the on-the-ground practices of IWRM.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2014
Malawi
Mozambique
Zambia
Southern Africa

The Chinyanja Triangle (CT) is an area inside the Zambezi

River Basin, inhabited by Chinyanja-speaking people

sharing a similar history, language and culture across

the dryland systems of the eastern province of Zambia,

southern and central regions of Malawi and Tete Province

of Mozambique. Chiefs and Chiefdoms play a critical role

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2014
Africa
Southern Africa

Ecosystem services assessment requires an integrated approach, as it is influenced by elements such as climate, hydrology and socio-economics, which in turn influence each other. However, there are few studies that integrate these elements in order to assess ecosystem services.

Reports & Research
December 2014
Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa
Middle Africa
Eastern Africa
Northern Africa
Southern Africa
Western Africa

The vulnerability of Africa’s agriculture to climate change is complex. It is shaped by biophysical, economic, socio-cultural, geographical, ecological, institutional, technological and governance processes that interact in intricate ways, and can together reduce farmers’ adaptive capacity. Women farmers with few resources are particularly vulnerable.