Why is prior consultation not yet an effective tool for conflict resolution? The case of Peru | Land Portal

Resource information

Date of publication: 
January 2013
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
eldis:A75597

This Working Paper from the German Institute of Global and Area Studies argues that new legislation in Peru will not help to turn prior consultations into a tool for conflict resolution as long as the normative framework itself is contested and the necessary basic conditions are not in place.

Prior consultation is an increasingly accepted instrument internationally for guaranteeing the rights of indigenous peoples. Conceived of theoretically as a means for conflict resolution, in practice it lies at the heart of social conflicts all over Latin America. Using concepts from the “contentious politics” approach, the authors take a closer look at Peru – where indigenous mobilisations would lead to the only Latin American consultation law enacted to date. They also critically analyse the content and formulation of its regulating norm. They argue that this new legislation will not help to turn such consultations into a tool for conflict resolution as long as the normative framework itself is contested and the necessary basic conditions are not in place. The most important conditions that they identify for implementing effective prior consultation are impartial state institutions capable of justly balancing the diverse interests at stake, measures that reduce power asymmetries within consultations, and joint decision?making processes with binding agreements.

Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

A. Schilling-Vacaflor
R. Flemmer

Publisher(s): 

The GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies is an independent social science research institute based in Hamburg, Germany. Our mission is to analyse political, social, and economic developments in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as global issues. As a member of the Leibniz Association, we are committed to the Leibniz principle of “theoria cum praxi”: science for the benefit of society.

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