Serial Offender: Vietnam’s continued imports of illegal Cambodian timber | Land Portal
Serial Offender: Vietnam’s continued imports of illegal Cambodian timber

Resource information

Date of publication: 
December 2018
Resource Language: 
Pages: 
15
License of the resource: 

Vietnam, which has a long history of theft of timber from neighbouring Laos and Cambodia, recently initialled a timber trade agreement with the European Union. This will see Vietnam implement legislation to address imports of illegally harvested or traded timber, in return for timber exports to the EU being deemed to comply with the requirements of the European Union Timber Regulation (EUTR).

With formal signing and ratification of this agreement expected in 2018, EIA went to the region during the 2017-18 dry season to investigate whether the illegal trade in Cambodian timber had ceased.

EIA identified three main areas within Cambodia where substantial illegal logging operations were under way: Virachey National Park in Rattanakiri province, the forests surrounding the Lower Sesan 2 dam in Stung Treng province, and Phnom Prich Wildlife Sanctuary in Mondulkiri province.

EIA tracked timber from these sites to where it entered Vietnam, both through an official border crossing at Hoa Lu in Bình Phước province and Le Thanh in Gia Lai province, and where it was smuggled out of Cambodia and into Vietnam across informal crossings near both Hoa Lu and Le Thanh.

Vietnam continues its role as a serial offender in the illegal timber trade, with large volumes of illegal timber still flowing across the Cambodian border unhindered.

Authors and Publishers

Corporate Author(s): 

EIA’s investigations are a trademark of our work around the world, but we tackle environmental crime and defend the natural world strategically, operating in a number of different ways.

Our findings are combined with scientific documentation and representation at international conventions, creating the hard-hitting campaigns which have earned us a global reputation.

Investigations

Publisher(s): 

EIA’s investigations are a trademark of our work around the world, but we tackle environmental crime and defend the natural world strategically, operating in a number of different ways.

Our findings are combined with scientific documentation and representation at international conventions, creating the hard-hitting campaigns which have earned us a global reputation.

Investigations