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DLG-Verlag was founded in 1952 as a subsidiary of DLG e.V. (Deutsche Landwirtschafts-Gesellschaft - German Agricultural Society) with its headquarter in Frankfurt/ Germany. The publishing company provides expertise for the agricultural and food sector.

With its subsidiaries Max-Eyth-Verlag and DLG-Agrofood Medien GmbH the DLG-Verlag offers books and magazines, as well as catalogs of the DLG's international DLG exhibitions.

DLG-Verlag Resources

Displaying 31 - 40 of 316
Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
August, 2015
Global

The multitude of certification schemes in seafood production has assumed massive dimensions, posing considerable challenges for all actors in the supply chain. Here, the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative seeks to provide a remedy.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
August, 2015
Global

Often with just one or two ponds managed by a single person or family, smallholders make up an important share of the world’s seafood production. So why are by far the minority of certified aquaculture operations smallholders?

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
August, 2015
Global

With its Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines), FAO has created a tool that is to help small-scale fisheries stakeholders empower themselves. Our authors describe its strengths and weaknesses and how it is being put into practice.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2015
Global

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will amount to little unless backed by reliable indicators. Only with good metrics can the agenda be implemented and progress measured. Just like the SDGs themselves, the indicators are still in the discussion phase, with the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) one of the many players in this process. They outline their recommendations in the following article, using rural development as an example to describe them.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2015
Global

The Sustainable Development Goals differ radically from the current Millennium Development Goals in many aspects. Our author demonstrates the challenges that departing from a donor-oriented development framework poses – particularly for the North, and also with a view to its own development.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2015
Global

With reference to the “One World – No Hunger” Initiative, Stefan Schmitz shows how food policies can support the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals and highlights the interdependencies between the individual goals and targets.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2015
Global

Meant well doesn’t always mean done well. The Sustainable Development Goals are all set to undermine themselves, Stephan Klasen maintains. The worst aspect is that people, who really ought to be at the focus, threaten to fall by the wayside in this technocratic maze of hundreds of goals, targets, and indicators.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2015
Global

Is it right to attach financial values to nature and to incorporate that valuation into the post-2015 agenda? Will such valuation help to protect species diversity and ecosystems? Or does it not rather harbour the risk that we cheerfully go on destroying nature since other aspects of the national accounts can be seen as compensation? Civil society is split on this issue. Our author points out why.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2015
Global

In the debate on climate change, it is frequently argued that the number of “climate refugees” is going to grow world-wide. So far, however, only little evidence has been provided of links between climate change, environmental changes and migration. The transdisciplinary research project “micle”– migration, climate & environment – has examined this link in selected areas of the Sahel zone.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2015
Kenya

In Kenya, smallholders are improving the health of their families by growing local cereal varieties and indigenous vegetables. The use of traditional foods is even helping people with HIV/AIDS.

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