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Acronym: 
ELDIS

Eldis is an online information service providing free access to relevant, up-to-date and diverse research on international development issues. The database includes over 40,000 summaries and provides free links to full-text research and policy documents from over 8,000 publishers. Each document is selected by members of our editorial team.

To help you get the information you need we organise documents into collections according to key development themes and the country or regionthey relate to. You can browse these on the website or find out about our subscribe options to get updates in a format that suits you.

Who produces ELDIS?

Eldis is hosted by IDS but our service profiles work by a growing global network of research organisations and knowledge brokers including 3ie, IGIDR in India, Soul Beat Africa, and the Philippines Institute for Development Studies. 

These partners help to ensure that Eldis can present a truly global picture of development research. We make a special effort to cover high quality research from smaller research producers, especially those from developing countries, alongside that of the larger, northern based, research organisations.

Who uses ELDIS?

Our website is predominantly used by development practitioners, decision makers and researchers. Over half a million users visit the site every year and more than 50% of our regular visitors are based in developing countries.

But Eldis is not just a website. All of our content is Open Licensed so that it can be re-used by anyone that needs it. Website managers, applications developers and Open Data enthusiasts can all re-use Eldis content to enhance their own services or develop new tools. See our Get the Data page for more information.

eldis Resources

Displaying 11 - 20 of 1156
Library Resource
January, 2017

The Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region has valuable and diverse coastal and marine resources, but much of its natural capital is either threatened or declining. The WIO encompasses rich diverse tropical and subtropical areas along the coastlines of Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and South Africa. This region also comprises vast oceanic areas and the island states of Madagascar, Seychelles, Comoros, Mauritius and Réunion. This paper focuses on the marine and coastal governance of mainland states in the region.

Library Resource
January, 2017
Ethiopia

The paper utilizes household panel data to investigate whether the land rental market can facilitate improved access to land for land-poor tenant households over time and thereby facilitate expansion of their farming activity. The paper utilizes data 8-17 years after land certification to assess the long-term effect of land certification on the allocative efficiency in the land rental market in areas where land certification stimulated land renting in the early years after certification.

Library Resource
January, 2017
Mali

 SOLIDARITES INTERNATIONAL works in the region of Kidal, in northern Mali, since 2015 to improve agro-pastoral activities through the implementation of WaSH activities. Underlying the rehabilitation of water points is the aim to reduce conflicts between different types of users: breeders and their herds and local populations for domestic uses.The team worked to identify the good practices that had been implemented in the first phase of this project funded by OFDA, between June 2015 and September 2016.

Library Resource
January, 2017
South Africa

Environmental,  social  and  governance  (ESG)  concerns  are  an  increasingly  important  factor worldwide for banks when they invest in large projects. In the Southern African region with its rich mineral deposits, this trend has added importance. Mining companies extract minerals from the ground, and their activities routinely give rise to public concerns about the pollution of water sources, adequate land for agriculture, and fair community participation in mining projects.

Library Resource
January, 2017
South Africa

Mutual suspicion has characterised the relationship between the South African government and mining companies, particularly in recent years. Resolving the current impasse would require a panoply of policy interventions because of the complexity and age of the mining industry. This briefing proposes that one such intervention could be the introduction of a structured workplace secondment programme between the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) and mining companies – together identifying critical areas for co-operation and skills transfer.

Library Resource
January, 2017
Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe confirmed that alluvial diamonds had been discovered in the Marange area in Mutare District in 2006. However, as in many otherAfrican countries, the promise diamond mining holds for economic growth has been eroded by a lack of transparency and accountability. The country’s diamond sector has been bedevilled by smuggling, opaque licensing, human rights abuses, self-enrichment by executives and public officials, and extremely limited accrual of diamond revenues to the fiscus, among others.

Library Resource
January, 2016
Tanzania

In Tanzania like in other parts of the global South, in the name of 'development' and 'poverty eradication' vast tracts of land have been earmarked by the government to be developed by investors for different commercial agricultural projects, giving rise to the contested land grab phenomenon. In parallel, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM ) has been promoted in the country and globally as the governance framework that seeks to manage water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable manner.

Library Resource
January, 2016
Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe's water reforms that were undertaken in the 1990s were meant to redress the colonially inherited inequalities to agricultural water, increase water security against frequent droughts, improve water management, and realise sustainable financing of the water sector. They were underpinned by the 1998 Water and Zimbabwe National Water Authority Acts, which were based on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) principles. This article describes how IWRM has been implemented against a backdrop of an ever - ev olving land reform programme and a struggling agriculture sector.

Library Resource
January, 2016
Rwanda, Zambia, Nicaragua, Vietnam, Madagascar, China, Peru, India, Malawi, Ethiopia, Cambodia

This paper reviews the literature to identify the relationship between tenure security and food security. The literatures on tenure issues and food security issues are not well connected and the scientific evidence on the causal links between tenure security and food security is very limited. The paper explores the conceptual linkages between land tenure reforms, tenure security and food security and illustrates how these vary across diverse contexts.

Library Resource
January, 2016
Algeria, Ethiopia

Population growth leads to growing land scarcity and landlessness in poor agrarian economies. Many of these also face severe climate risks that may increase in the future. Tenure security is important for food security in such countries and at the same time threatened by social instability that further accelerate rural-urban and international migration. Provision of secure property rights with low-cost methods that create investment incentives can lead to land use intensification and improved food security.

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