International Development Research Centre | Page 12 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
IDRC·CRDI

Location

Canada
CA

About IDRC

A Crown corporation, we support leading thinkers who advance knowledge and solve practical development problems. We provide the resources, advice, and training they need to implement and share their solutions with those who need them most. In short, IDRC increases opportunities—and makes a real difference in people’s lives.

Working with our development partners, we multiply the impact of our investment and bring innovations to more people in more countries around the world. We offer fellowships and awards to nurture a new generation of development leaders.

What we do

IDRC funds research in developing countries to create lasting change on a large scale.

To make knowledge a tool for addressing pressing challenges, we

- provide developing-country researchers financial resources, advice, and training to help them find solutions to local problems.

- encourage knowledge sharing with policymakers, researchers, and communities around the world.

- foster new talent by offering fellowships and awards.

- strive to get new knowledge into the hands of those who can use it.

In doing so, we contribute to Canada’s foreign policy, complementing the work of Global Affairs Canada, and other government departments and agencies.

Members: 

International Development Research Centre Resources

Displaying 111 - 120 of 259
Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2011
Sub-Saharan Africa

Women in many African countries have a legal right to
own land, but this often means little in areas where
“customary law” prevails. As a result, researchers in two
countries have come to believe that women’s security
of tenure depends as much on addressing social
assumptions as on enacting legal reforms.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2011
Uganda

Despite formal legal recognition of women’s land rights, no government institution is mandated to protect women’s land rights or to ensure their legal implementation and enforcement. The roles of decentralized land administration institutions do not include the protection of women’s land rights. More importantly, District Land Boards only control the allocation of public land and not private or customary. Several land dispute resolution institutions co-exist without clear coordination mechanisms.

Library Resource
Institutional & promotional materials
December, 2011

IAI projects funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and Canada's IDRC included support of research in the La Plata Basin, which has experienced extensive land use changes. Projects examine the effects of hydrological and climate change on agriculture, as well as how land use feeds back into effects on regional hydrology and climate, both economically and socially. Several articles in this newsletter present results of these interactions, such as an economic analysis of flooding, effects on soil carbon stocks, and drivers of land use change.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
November, 2011
Africa

Includes experiences from the field (East Africa, Malawi, Cameroon, Senegal, Colombia, Pakistan). Lessons learned include participation-oriented research methods are recommended. Merely passing legislation is of little effect without the necessary resources for implementation, monitoring reforms or effective sanctions. Crucial to consult and involve women when designing reforms and monitoring their implementation. Addressing land injustices requires varied approaches. Vital to establish and maintain links among research, policy, practice and people.

Library Resource

Securing Rights for Better Lives

Journal Articles & Books
January, 2011
Eastern Africa, Global, Tanzania, Cameroon, Colombia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Senegal, Uganda

Here it is an important book on Women's Land Rights, published by the International Development Research Centre.

Library Resource
Institutional & promotional materials
December, 2010

This e-newsletter issue argues for the prioritization of Sustainable Land management (SLM), given the dependency of the livelihoods of local communities on land and land resources. There are existing legal and legislative frameworks for citizens’ participation in decision making and development, however practice to date does not reflect effective participation of districts in central government planning, and sub-counties in district level planning. The report outlines barriers to policy development and practices as well as reparative policy reform proposals.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2010

The report covers activities and outcomes of various projects for enhancing women’s access to land and land titles in Kenya, Mozambique, Madagascar, Nairobi and in other areas of East and Southern Africa, as well as raising awareness about women’s land rights.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2010
Tanzania

Posted in: African farm news in review, issue #133

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
December, 2010
Sub-Saharan Africa

The conceptual difference between conventional scientific and natural resource management (NRM) research is based on the need for researchers and the NRM community to be joint learning partners in the process. “Managing Natural Resources for Development in Africa” is a collective endeavour to reframe, filter and contextualize some of the main concepts, theories and practices of NRM. It provides up to date information, and discusses approaches that can equip African graduates with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to respond to changes in social and ecological systems.

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