International Development Research Centre | Page 3 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
IDRC·CRDI

Location

Canada
CA

About IDRC

A Crown corporation, we support leading thinkers who advance knowledge and solve practical development problems. We provide the resources, advice, and training they need to implement and share their solutions with those who need them most. In short, IDRC increases opportunities—and makes a real difference in people’s lives.

Working with our development partners, we multiply the impact of our investment and bring innovations to more people in more countries around the world. We offer fellowships and awards to nurture a new generation of development leaders.

What we do

IDRC funds research in developing countries to create lasting change on a large scale.

To make knowledge a tool for addressing pressing challenges, we

- provide developing-country researchers financial resources, advice, and training to help them find solutions to local problems.

- encourage knowledge sharing with policymakers, researchers, and communities around the world.

- foster new talent by offering fellowships and awards.

- strive to get new knowledge into the hands of those who can use it.

In doing so, we contribute to Canada’s foreign policy, complementing the work of Global Affairs Canada, and other government departments and agencies.

Members: 

International Development Research Centre Resources

Displaying 21 - 30 of 259
Library Resource
Reports & Research
July, 2018
India, Southern Asia

This detailed report summarises key findings from an extensive Regional Diagnostic Study (RDS) for South Asia. Despite intense analytical efforts at the sub-regional level, reliable downscaled data may not be available with current models. As well, the spatial scale of available downscaled climate products (Regional Climate Models) may preclude their use in local decision-making. Often, locally significant drivers such as land use-land cover change overwhelm the influence of climatic drivers.

Library Resource
Policy Papers & Briefs
December, 2017
Uganda, Sub-Saharan Africa

This policy brief presents strengths and weaknesses of state and traditional land justice institutions in relation to access, costs and speed in concluding the process of resolving land cases. In the current legal and institutional framework, strengthening of the customary justice system would bring benefits. With 93% of land in the Northern and Eastern regions under customary tenure, the most important institution is the clan, yet clan rulings are most often ignored by a parallel state system.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
December, 2017
Mali, Nigeria, Uganda, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

Grassroots organizations do not need to wait for the state to implement Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (Tenure Guidelines or TGs). Rural communities can take governance into their own hands and use TGs as a tool for investigation, reflection and action. The challenge is how to take the next step: under what conditions can TGs provide the rural poor with resources to organize and mobilize?

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2017
Kenya, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

This research reviews legislation and policies in Zimbabwe that have a direct or indirect bearing on the relocation of communities. The current model for large-scale investments has changed from previous models, where the majority of investment projects were undertaken by international companies with limited governmental intervention. While relocation of communities may be inevitable, it is argued that such actions should take into account constitutional provisions, regional and international best practices.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2017
Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa

How and why do political reactions of certain rural groups align or depart from those of others? Findings suggest that in settler societies, aspects of green grabbing (or land grabbing) may be understood as acts of “white belonging.” Likewise, green grabbing presents other groups with opportunities to re-assert other notions of belonging in the landscape through resistance, acquiescence, or incorporation.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2017
Cameroon, Sub-Saharan Africa

The study illustrates that small holders, particularly women, are increasingly losing farmland. It questions the social development impact of large-scale land acquisitions (LSLAs) in Cameroon in terms of better living standards and reduction of poverty. It also examines how and under what conditions women can be empowered to effectively engage with LSLAs to ensure that legal and policy frameworks foster better accountability and legitimacy in land governance. Most untitled land in Cameroon is now national land held under customary tenancy, without security.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2017
Uganda, Sub-Saharan Africa

This report outlines administrative ways to harmonise state and traditional institutions in terms of land justice in Uganda. Customary justice within the traditional clan system in Uganda offers big advantages over the state judicial system in terms of physical access and costs. A significant weakness of the state justice system is the heavy backlog of land related cases in courts. Perception of and experiences of corruption in the state judicial system are rife.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2017
Ivory Coast, Sub-Saharan Africa

A severe outbreak of Côte d’Ivoire lethal yellowing disease (CILY) has been wreaking havoc throughout coconut farms since 2013. This study provides an analysis of crop-specific land use change, applying a multinomial probit model based on a theoretical land use model to predict the spatial distribution of land use within the department of Grand-Lahou in Côte d’Ivoire where coconut plantations have been devastated by CILY disease.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
December, 2017
Haiti

The paper provides a case study of the conversion of state land in the Commune of Limonade, from a community-controlled agricultural economy to a large-scale agro-export banana plantation called Agritrans. This study shows how repurposing state land may impact food security and social stability of peasant farmers. The Agritrans plantation, designed and implemented by Haitian businessman and current President Jovenel Moïse, is used as a blueprint for Haiti’s development future.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
December, 2017
Zimbabwe, Sub-Saharan Africa

The impacts of large-scale agricultural investments on rural communities’ land ownership, food security, productivity, income, and access to education and health differ within and between communities depending on business and government influence. Recent examples of large-scale investment models are dependent on the legal landscape in the investor’s country of origin, the investor-community linkages, and the nature of partnership with governments.

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