International Development Research Centre | Page 9 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
IDRC·CRDI

Location

Canada
CA

About IDRC

A Crown corporation, we support leading thinkers who advance knowledge and solve practical development problems. We provide the resources, advice, and training they need to implement and share their solutions with those who need them most. In short, IDRC increases opportunities—and makes a real difference in people’s lives.

Working with our development partners, we multiply the impact of our investment and bring innovations to more people in more countries around the world. We offer fellowships and awards to nurture a new generation of development leaders.

What we do

IDRC funds research in developing countries to create lasting change on a large scale.

To make knowledge a tool for addressing pressing challenges, we

- provide developing-country researchers financial resources, advice, and training to help them find solutions to local problems.

- encourage knowledge sharing with policymakers, researchers, and communities around the world.

- foster new talent by offering fellowships and awards.

- strive to get new knowledge into the hands of those who can use it.

In doing so, we contribute to Canada’s foreign policy, complementing the work of Global Affairs Canada, and other government departments and agencies.

Members: 

International Development Research Centre Resources

Displaying 81 - 90 of 259
Library Resource
Reports & Research
October, 2014
Argentina, Paraguay

Exploration and mapping of alternative land uses suggest ways to foster territorial development pathways that can coexist with a forest cover. As the Pampas and Chaco are becoming one of the most relevant global grain suppliers of South America, the fast expansion of crops over pastures (Pampas) and dry forests (Chaco), ongoing climate changes, and extremely flat topography, make these regions vulnerable to rapid and non-linear hydrological shifts, including long-lasting floods and salinization processes.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
April, 2014
Cambodia

Community forestry (CF) and Community Protected Areas (CPA) have been established for well over a decade in Siem Reap province. The study investigates the socioeconomic benefits gained by CPA and CF members from their participation in Community-Based Resources Management CBNRM. In CBNRM, local communities are responsible for the management of local resources. However, many CBNRM initiatives in Cambodia are more controlled by government than by communities. The report analyzes and compares two communities and the results of their CBNRM practices.

Library Resource
Videos
March, 2014
India

How can wetland management better take into account climate uncertainty, considering the risks posed to the important services wetlands provide? Ritesh Kumar of Wetlands International --South Asia explains that climate change and environmental impacts are affecting the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people that rely on wetland services provided by Chilika Lagoon in India. The project team is working with local government authorities to identify strategies for improving community resilience to such changes.

Library Resource
Peer-reviewed publication
December, 2013
Uganda, Eastern Africa

Land degradation is severe in the steep sloping highlands in eastern Africa; natural resource management is central to good governance and increasing enfranchisement of rural people. Devolution, the transfer of roles, responsibilities and rights of natural resource management to institutions and communities has proved effective in accelerating adoption of sustainable land management (SLM) innovations beyond pilot sites. The SLM technologies practiced in the area include the use of trenches, contour bunds, terraces and agro forestry.

Library Resource
Peer-reviewed publication
December, 2013
Ethiopia, Uganda

Key challenges encountered while operationalizing the African Highlands Initiative (AHI) devolution model are linked to coordination management, with issues arising out of collaboration processes. Capacity at local government level is weak and characterized by high turnover of staff. Joint visioning, planning, budgeting, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, are essential. Team building skills, leadership, and systems thinking are required.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
December, 2013

This chapter uses both classic and contemporary literature to trace how land policies, and particularly land reform, have gained, lost, and regained prominence in development strategies and debates since the Second World War. It introduces contemporary issues and debates on gender and generational issues in land policy and land grabbing involving sometimes spectacularly large corporate land deals, and concluding with reflections on new ideas of food and land sovereignty that drive today’s agrarian movements.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2013
Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa

Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) could enable some of the poorest forest communities to be paid to conserve and protect their forest resources by companies seeking to offset carbon emissions. This project examines the REDD mechanism from a pro-poor perspective, particularly from the standpoint of local communities, and assesses knowledge gaps among community residents and leaders about carbon trading to avoid deforestation – do they understand and appreciate the rules as they have been developed through a distant global discourse?

Library Resource
Peer-reviewed publication
December, 2013
Ethiopia, Uganda

Scaling up is not just about technology transfer but a critical understanding of the needs and visions of farmers as well. Despite the success of pilot projects for Integrated Natural Resource Management implemented in the study area, effect and uptake of the pilot tested innovations have been insignificant. This study assesses implications of adopting Innovative Platforms (IP) as a means of accelerating uptake and utilization of sustainable land management (SLM) technologies in the highlands of eastern Uganda.

Library Resource
Peer-reviewed publication
December, 2013
Ethiopia

Use of inorganic fertilizers could be fundamental in addressing low and declining soil fertility while improving food security in sub-Sahara Africa. Determination of key factors responsible for use of inorganic fertilizers in the central highlands of Ethiopia is increasingly important as continued land redistribution in already degraded and land-scarce highlands undermines sustainable farming and increases nutrient mining.

Library Resource
Peer-reviewed publication
December, 2013
Ethiopia, Uganda, Eastern Africa

Fostering collective action is necessary for scaling sustainable land management (SLM) innovations. This paper analyses the significance of social networks in SLM among agricultural rural communities in central Ethiopia and eastern Uganda. Social networks facilitate collective action important for small-scale resource-poor farmers, who tend to rely more on informal sources of information, as well as for women farmers, whose information needs are often not addressed by formal extension services.

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