World Resources Institute | Page 9 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
WRI
Focal point: 
Peter Veit

World Resources Institute

The World Resources Institute is a global environmental think tank that goes beyond research to put ideas into action. We work with governments, companies, and civil society to build solutions to urgent environmental challenges. WRI’s transformative ideas protect the earth and promote development because sustainability is essential to meeting human needs and fulfilling human aspirations in the future.

WRI spurs progress by providing practical strategies for change and effective tools to implement them. We measure our success in the form of new policies, products, and practices that shift the ways governments work, companies operate, and people act.

We operate globally because today’s problems know no boundaries. We are avid communicators because people everywhere are inspired by ideas, empowered by knowledge, and moved to change by greater understanding. We provide innovative paths to a sustainable planet through work that is accurate, fair, and independent.

World Resources Institute Resources

Displaying 81 - 88 of 88
Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2007
Kenya, Africa, Eastern Africa

This report provides a new approach to integrating spatial data on poverty and ecosystems in Kenya. It is endorsed by five permanent secretaries in Kenya and with a foreword by Wangari Maathai (recipient of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize). It provides a new approach to examining the links between ecosystem services (the benefits derived from nature) and the poor. Through a series of maps and analyses, the authors focus on the environmental resources most Kenyans rely on such as soil, water, forest, rangeland, livestock, and wildlife.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
December, 2003
Cameroon

Cameroon's 1994 Forestry law launched a new approach to natural resource management. The 1996 Constitution introduced decentralized authorities, whose role is to enable the economic, social and cultural development of its peoples. The new legal framework for environmental policy and overhaul of the Constitution show the Government's will to decentralize and to improve forest resources management. At the same time, decentralization management might be inappropriate in Cameroon.

Library Resource
Reports & Research
November, 1997
Myanmar

Lots of maps...Burma holds half of the remaining forest in mainland Southeast Asia. Having lost virtually all of their original forest cover, Burma's neighbors -- China, India, and Thailand -- rely increasingly on Burma as a source of timber. Most of the regional timber trade is illegal. (See The Regional Timber Trade in Southeast Asia.)

Library Resource
Reports & Research
November, 1997
Myanmar

Map of cover in 1985

Project
Implementing organizations: 
Geographical focus: 

The project aims to ensure decision makers (in public and private sector) implement policies to support socially equitable oil palm expansion onto low- carbon degraded land and reduce conversion of forested areas. The programme will address critical governance questions around how to grant access to suitable land, how to revoke permits, how to change land status and how to involve local people in decisions where their rights are affected.

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