| Land Portal

Land governance by country

The country pages provide a comprehensive space, where avid learners can come to explore and gain a better understanding of land governance issues in various countries around the world.

Much of the information here below has been developed in collaboration with local partner organizations and contains comprehensive data and information.  

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uganda agriculture

Uganda is landlocked country located in East Africa with an area of 236,040 square kilometers (146,675 square miles) and a total land boundary of 2,698 kilometers (1,676 miles). It is a natural resource dependent country, and agriculture is dominated by small-holder farmers. Therefore, land is an essential asset for the population and national development. Consequently, government has turned its attention to law and policy reforms that address land-governance challenges, some of which emerge from historical injustices and the colonial legacy.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Uganda.

With a large population and limited availability of land, Vietnam’s endowment of 0.3 hectare of agricultural land per person is among the lowest in the world.Vietnam is historically a nation of small-scale rice farmers: the average farm size is 1,560 square meters, less than one-third that of Thailand or Cambodia. Rapid economic growth in the past two decades has converted up to one million hectares of household farmland...

Learn more about the successes and challenges in Vietnam.

original_zambia.jpg

Zambia has a bifurcated land tenure system which results from a legacy of colonial land administration. Under the British governor in 1928, Zambian land was divided into crown land and reserve native land. Later in 1947 the Native Trust Order was passed which gave birth to trust land. Crown land made up 6 percent of the country, while native and trust land both totalled up to 94 percent. After independence, crown land was converted to state land. Reserve native and trust land remained as such until the 1995 Land Act at which point these tenure types began being labeled as "customary" land. The Land Acquisition Act of 1970 inspired the ‘zambianisation’ (nationalisation) program, which sealed the deal of the 1975 Land (Conversion of Titles) Act that halted freehold tenure system in Zambia. All land in Zambia has since then been vested in the President, who holds it in perpetuity on behalf of the Zambian people.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Zambia.

zimbabwe agriculture woman farmer photo by USAID

Land issues—including extreme racial disparities in land ownership, insecurity of land tenure and property rights, control over fertile land and mineral reserves, and insecurity of community land rights—have played a central role in Zimbabwe’s history which continues to this day.  Located in Southern Africa, between South Africa and Zambia, Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) achieved independence from colonial rule in 1980. Though rich in mineral resources, the vast majority of Zimbabweans live in poverty. By January 2009, only 6% of the population worked in the formal sector.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Zimbabwe.

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