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Non-Timber Forest Products

Institutional & promotional materials
Abril, 2018

Fact sheet on activities of Action Against Desertification to develop non-timber forest products. Action Against Desertification is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) in support of the Great Green Wall initiative and UNCCD national action programmes to combat desertification, implemented by FAO and partners with funding of the European Union.

Déployer la Grande Muraille Verte d'Afrique

Institutional & promotional materials
Abril, 2018
Burkina Faso
Nigeria
Gambia
Fiji
Haiti
Senegal
Ethiopia
Niger
Africa

Fiche d'information sur les activités d'Action contre la désertification. Action contre la désertification est une initiative du Groupe des États d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique en appui à l’initiative de la Grande Muraille Verte et aux programmes d’action nationaux de lutte contre la désertification de l’UNCCD, mise en œuvre par la FAO et ses partenaires avec le financement de l’Union européenne.

Monitoring and evaluation

Institutional & promotional materials
Abril, 2018
India
Burkina Faso

Fact sheet on Monitoring and Evaluation activities of Action Against Desertification. Action Against Desertification is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) in support of the Great Green Wall initiative and UNCCD national action programmes to combat desertification, implemented by FAO and partners with funding of the European Union.

Land restoration

Institutional & promotional materials
Abril, 2018
Burkina Faso
Nigeria
Gambia
Mali
Fiji
Haiti
Senegal
Ethiopia
Niger

Fact sheet on land restoration activities of Action Against Desertification. Action Against Desertification is an initiative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) in support of the Great Green Wall initiative and UNCCD national action programmes to combat desertification, implemented by FAO and partners with funding of the European Union.

Re-Placing the Desert in the Conservation Landscape: Charisma and Absence in the Gobi Desert

Peer-reviewed publication
Março, 2018
China
Mongólia

Across the Gobi Desert in China and Mongolia, millions of newly planted trees struggle to survive amid adverse ecological conditions. They were planted by a wide variety of actors in an attempt to protect, restore, or modify the local environment, despite evidence of their negative consequences upon local ecosystems. This paper investigates how these afforestation projects both challenge and affirm recent theoretical work on conservation, while also providing key insights into the decision-making framework of land management across the world’s third largest desert region.

Unjust Burden. How smallholder farmers in Africa are adapting to climate change to improve their food security

Reports & Research
Dezembro, 2017
África

Over the last two decades, 200 million people across the world have been lifted out of hunger. But as climate change brings more frequent and severe weather shocks such as droughts and floods, and makes rainfall patterns less predictable, these gains are under threat, especially among Africa’s smallholder farmers. Agriculture is Africa’s biggest employer. But mean temperatures are expected to rise faster in the continent than the global average, decreasing crop yields and deepening poverty.

Biodiversity and the Great Green Wall : Managing nature for sustainable development in the Sahel

Journal Articles & Books
Novembro, 2017
Global

The Great Green Wall is one of the main vehicles for delivering the Sustainable Development Goals and the Rio conventions in the Sahel. Biodiversity is the foundation of the Great Green Wall in many ways, determining soil productivity and water cycles and providing the foundation for risk management and resilient ecosystems. The Great Green Wall can make a major contribution to achieving many of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Combating Desertification and Erosion Activities in Turkey

Journal Articles & Books
Novembro, 2017
Turquia

The desertification is described as the land degradation occurring as a result of climate change and human activities in arid, semi-arid and semi-humid areas. In today’s world, climate change, desertification, land degradation and drought are amongst the most critical issues as they affect over 4 billion hectares of land in more than 164 countries, and directly impact approximately 1.5 billion people. These hazards threaten not only the environment, but also economy, security, development, food security and social life in Turkey as well as around the globe.

Sustainable Land Management for Climate and People. Science-Policy Brief 03

Journal Articles & Books
Novembro, 2017
Etiópia
Nicarágua
Estados Unidos

Land provides crucial ecosystem services for human existence and human well-being, including provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural services. Those services provide among others the production of fresh air, food, feed, fuel and fibre. They regulate the risks of natural hazards and climate change, offer cultural and spiritual values to our society, and support key ecological functions such as nutrient and water cycling, filtering and buffering, and are central to economic vitality.

Scaling Up Sustainable Land Management and Restoration of Degraded Land

Conference Papers & Reports
Agosto, 2017
Global

With current rates of land degradation reaching
ten to twelve million ha per year, there is an
urgent need to scale up and out successful,
profitable and resource-efficient sustainable
land management practices to maintain the
health and resilience of the land that humans
depend on. As much as 500 million out of
two billion ha of degraded land, mainly in
developing countries, have restoration potential,
offering an immediate target for restoration
and rehabilitation initiatives.1 In the past,

Rangelands: Where Anthromes Meet Their Limits

Peer-reviewed publication
Junho, 2017

Defining rangelands as anthromes enabled Ellis and Ramankutty (2008) to conclude that more than three-quarters of Earth’s land is anthropogenic; without rangelands, this figure would have been less than half. They classified all lands grazed by domestic livestock as rangelands, provided that human population densities were low; similar areas without livestock were excluded and classified instead as ‘wildlands’. This paper examines the empirical basis and conceptual assumptions of defining and categorizing rangelands in this fashion.