Land Market Restrictions, Women's Labor Force Participation, and Wages in a Rural Economy | Land Portal

Informações sobre recurso

Date of publication: 
Janeiro 2016
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
oai:openknowledge.worldbank.org:10986/23624
Copyright details: 
CC BY 3.0 IGO

This paper analyzes the effects of land
market restrictions on the rural labor market outcomes for
women. The existing literature emphasizes two mechanisms
through which land restrictions can affect the economic
outcomes: the collateral value of land, and (in) security of
property rights. Analysis of this paper focuses on an
alternative mechanism where land restrictions increase costs
of migration out of villages. The testable prediction of
collateral effect is that both wages and labor force
participation move in the same direction, and insecurity of
property rights reduces labor force participation and
increases wages. In contrast, if land restrictions work
primarily through higher migration costs, labor force
participation increases, while wages decline. For
identification, this paper exploits a natural experiment in
Sri Lanka where historical malaria played a unique role in
land policy. This paper provides robust evidence of a
positive effect of land restrictions on womens labor force
participation, but a negative effect on female wages. The
empirical results thus contradict a collateral or insecure
property rights effect, but support migration costs as the
primary mechanism.

Autores e editores

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 
Emran, M. Shahe Shilpi, Forhad
Publisher(s): 

The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. We are not a bank in the ordinary sense but a unique partnership to reduce poverty and support development.

Provedor de dados

The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. We are not a bank in the ordinary sense but a unique partnership to reduce poverty and support development.

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