Overseas Development Institute | Page 8 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
ODI

The Overseas Development Institute (ODI) is the UK's leading independent think tank on international development and humanitarian issues.

Mission 

Our mission is to inspire and inform policy and practice which lead to the reduction of poverty, the alleviation of suffering and the achievement of sustainable livelihoods in developing countries.

We do this by locking together high quality applied research, practical policy advice, and policy-focused dissemination and debate.

We work with partners in the public and private sectors, in both developing and developed countries.

Values

  • Independence: ODI’s research, public affairs and policy advice are independent from its funders, and staff are able to challenge donor thinking and policy and the wider development consensus.
  • High quality: Best practice, innovative approaches and continuous improvement are ensured in research, policy advice and public affairs.
  • Fairness, diversity and equality: All staff and partners are treated fairly and with respect. ODI employment, disciplines and processes are appropriate for an institute focused on international development.
  • Working together: There is continuous effort to foster better relationships throughout the organisation.
  • Transparency and accountability: There is open reporting on the use of public funds, with full communication of our work to our donors, research subjects and partners.
  • Sustainability: Resources are used in a sustainable way that reflects consciousness of the impact on the environment. The organisation works in a way that is sustainable, backed by commitment to its long-term viability.

Overseas Development Institute Resources

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Library Resource
Materiais institucionais e promocionais
Dezembro, 2012
Nepal, Vietnam, Sudeste Asiático

Natural disaster management and agriculture tend to dominate discussions on climate change adaptation. But forests matter too. In fact, they matter a lot. Recent research is beginning to uncover just how much forest-based products and services contribute to the livelihoods of rural communities globally – now believed to be approximately one-fifth to one-quarter of household income. We need to begin paying more attention to how forests can increase the resilience of communities to impending climate change impacts.

Library Resource
Materiais institucionais e promocionais
Dezembro, 2012
Indonésia, Cambodja, Laos, Malásia, Sudeste Asiático

What do opportunity costs mean in the context of REDD+ and what are the implications for local communities? Farmers intuitively know the importance of opportunity costs. To tackle deforestation in a socially equitable way, we must consider what the drivers of deforestation are and what incentives and livelihood opportunities accompany them.

Library Resource
Documentos e Resumos de Políticas
Abril, 2012
Etiópia

Introduction: Water as a range management tool The pastoral system - the inter-relationship between livestock, natural resources and people / institutions - has evolved to function effectively and efficiently in areas of low and unpredictable rainfall, using mobility as one of the key adaptation strategies. Although having undergone changes over the years, the pastoralist system comprises fundamental elements which have allowed it to persist for millennia.

Library Resource
Multimídia
Maio, 2011
Etiópia, África, África Oriental

In early May 2011, people working on the Nile Basin Development Challenge (http://nilebdc.org) met in Addis Ababa in a 'science and reflection workshop'. Session 2 of the workshop examined institutional and other processes that are key to success of the overall program. In this video, Josie Tucker (ODI) reports from small group discussions on ways to support more flexible and participatory implementation of rainwater management and innovation at the local and regional levels.

Library Resource
Materiais institucionais e promocionais
Maio, 2011
Índia, Nepal, Sudeste Asiático

International discussions on REDD+ and climate change have explicitly addressed the needs of indigenous peoples. However, to date, efforts to link REDD+ and climate change activities to the specific protection of rights of women have been very limited. This brief explores how REDD+ planning and implementation can and should enhance the conditions of rural women in Asia and the Pacific.

Library Resource
Materiais institucionais e promocionais
Janeiro, 2011
Sudeste Asiático

REDD+ is based on the right to benefit from (or to be compensated for) reducing forest-based emissionsn of greenhouse gases, either through fund-based payments, carbon market payments, or a combination of these. But who can claim this right? Should an entitlement to payment depend on who owns the so-called "carbon rights"? This raises a number of legal issues, including how to define and allocate carbon rights in national REDD+ frameworks.

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