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28 July 2020
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The second round of LAND-at-scale resulted in 24 ideas submitted by 19 Dutch embassies. The LAND-at-scale Committee selected 6 most promising ideas to develop further. 

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South African Council for Planners logo

The South African Council for Planners (SACPLAN) is the statutory Council of nominated members appointed in terms of the Planning Profession Act, 2002 (Act 36 of 2002) by the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform (Department of Rural Development and Land Reform) to regulate the Planning Profession (Planning is both the organisational process of creating and maintaining a plan) in terms of the Act.


With the establishment of the African Farmers’ Association of South Africa (AFASA) in Boksburg on 11 and 12 April 2011, developing farmers now have a new, powerful voice. The launch of AFASA is the culmination of a yearlong consultation process with developing farmers country-wide to determine their need for an official structure that represents their interests.

South African Cities Network logo

The South African Cities Network (SACN) is an established network of South African cities and partners that encourages the exchange of information, experience and best practices on urban development and city management. Since 2002 the SACN’s objectives are to:


  • Promote good governance and management in South African cities
  • Analyse strategic challenges facing South African cities
SCLC Logo

SCLC's focus is on labour, tenure and human rights of farm- and forestry workers and dwellers, access to land and resources for small-scale / subsistence farmers and producers, and support and solidarity for communities resisting land development which threatens their homes, livelihoods, health and heritage.

The Southern African Legal Information Institute (SAFLII) is an online repository of legal information from South Africa that aims to promote the rule of law and judicial accountability by publishing legal material for open access in line with the objectives of the global Free Access to Law Movement.

Natural Justice: Lawyers for Communities and the Environment is a non-profit organization, registered in South Africa since 2007.


Our vision is the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity through the self-determination of Indigenous peoples and local communities.


SALO logo

The South African Land Observatory is an initiative whose overall objective is to promote evidence-based and inclusive decision-making over land resources in South Africa. As its name ‘Observatory’ suggests, it collects data and information on land. The initiative is a repository of what is published on land in South Africa and on the events that take place around land in South Africa.

The Elsenburg Agricultural Training Institute (officially known, from 1 April 2004, as the Cape Institute for Agricultural Training: Elsenburg) was established in 1898 as the first agricultural college of its kind in South Africa. It offers a bachelor's degree in agriculture in association with the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences at the University of Stellenbosch.

Commonwealth Forestry Association logo

What we do


We are reminded on a daily basis that the natural environment in which we live is vitally important for our well-being, whether it is in the form of climate change, global warming, declining fertility or dwindling natural resources.


“As South Africans we can achieve anything we wish, including putting human and social science research into action, as we put our minds to it and work together with a common purpose to uplift our people beyond inequality and gender differences.”


The HSRC was established in 1968 as South Africa’s statutory research agency and has grown to become the largest dedicated research institute in the social sciences and humanities on the African continent, doing cutting-edge public research in areas that are crucial to development.

Dutch traders landed at the southern tip of modern day South Africa in 1652 and established a stopover point on the spice route between the Netherlands and the Far East, founding the city of Cape Town. After the British seized the Cape of Good Hope area in 1806, many of the Dutch settlers (Afrikaners, called "Boers" (farmers) by the British) trekked north to found their own republics in lands taken from the indigenous black inhabitants. The discovery of diamonds (1867) and gold (1886) spurred wealth and immigration and intensified the subjugation of the native inhabitants.