Characteristics of Land Use Change in China before and after 2000 | Land Portal

Informations sur la ressource

Date of publication: 
janvier 2022
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
LP-midp001965
Copyright details: 
© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article

China, with notable population blooming and economic development in the last decades, has experienced profound land-use changes, which, in turn, dramatically impacted the regional, even global and environment system. However, characteristics of land-use changes in China have not yet been well addressed, especially around the year 2000 when a series of land policies were put forward, such as the project of “returning farmland to forest”. To fill this gap, this paper investigated the temporal and spatial patterns of land use changes in China for the period from 1987 to 2010, by taking advantage of the continually updated China Land Use Database developed from remote sensing images. The land-use dynamic matrix, zonal model, and transition matrix were employed to characterize land-use change patterns for four time intervals (1987–1995, 1995–2000, 2000–2005, and 2005–2010) on the dimensions of conversion and modification. Results showed that land-use change affected 4 × 105 km2 (4.5%) of the total landscape in China for more than the past twenty years. Of the six land-use types, built-up land experienced the largest net increase by almost 30% (52,434 km2), with the rate of expansion accelerating after 1995. The area of cropland increased before 2000 and declined afterwards, ending with a net increase in 14,280 km2, approximately 1% of its original area. The loss in the eastern coastal region is attributed mainly to built-up land expansion, while the gain in northern China, with the price of grassland and woodland shrinking, reshaped the cropland distribution in China. The area of woodland decreased slightly by 7880 km2 without a clear pattern over time. The modification of woodland indicated an intensive forest management in terms of planting fast-growing trees in the south of China. Grassland continues to shrink at a decreasing rate, and the modification of grassland shows a tendency of transformation from sparse grassland into a dense one in the 21st century. Trade-offs among demands on food security, economic development, and environment protection forced and shaped the contemporary land-use change in China. These results contribute to understanding the trends and causes of land use change in China, which could provide underpinning knowledge for assessing environmental change, and provide insights on future land planning.

Auteurs et éditeurs

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

Zhu, ZijuanZhang, ZengxiangZhao, XiaoliZuo, LijunWang, Xiao

Corporate Author(s): 
sustainability-logo.png

 


Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050; CODEN: SUSTDE) is an international, cross-disciplinary, scholarly and open access journal of environmental, cultural, economic, and social sustainability of human beings. Sustainabilityprovides an advanced forum for studies related to sustainability and sustainable development, and is published monthly online by MDPI. 


Sustainability is an Open Access journal.


    Publisher(s): 

    MDPI AG, a publisher of open-access scientific journals, was spun off from the Molecular Diversity Preservation International organization. It was formally registered by Shu-Kun Lin and Dietrich Rordorf in May 2010 in Basel, Switzerland, and maintains editorial offices in China, Spain and Serbia. MDPI relies primarily on article processing charges to cover the costs of editorial quality control and production of articles. Over 280 universities and institutes have joined the MDPI Institutional Open Access Program; authors from these organizations pay reduced article processing charges.

    Fournisseur de données

    MDPI AG, a publisher of open-access scientific journals, was spun off from the Molecular Diversity Preservation International organization. It was formally registered by Shu-Kun Lin and Dietrich Rordorf in May 2010 in Basel, Switzerland, and maintains editorial offices in China, Spain and Serbia. MDPI relies primarily on article processing charges to cover the costs of editorial quality control and production of articles. Over 280 universities and institutes have joined the MDPI Institutional Open Access Program; authors from these organizations pay reduced article processing charges.

    Partagez cette page