Biofuels Investment and Community Land Tenure in Tanzania | Land Portal
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Informations sur la ressource

Date of publication: 
novembre 2013
Resource Language: 
Pages: 
27
License of the resource: 

 One of the most wellknown biofuel investments was that of Bioshape, which acquired approximately 34,000 ha in Kilwa District for the cultivation of jatropha.


 By 2009, Bioshape was bankrupt and had withdrawn from Kilwa, only ever cultivating a small area of jatropha trial plots and engaging in some timber harvesting from their much larger plot of land. The land they acquired was, according to formal procedures under the Village Land Act, transferred from village land to general land in order to grant the land lease to the investor, Bioshape. Bioshape’s demise, like that of a number of other highprofile biofuels investments in Tanzania and throughout Africa, created uncertainty as to what would be the impacts on the local communities that had ceded their land, and in fact their perpetual customary rights to that land, to the company. This report examines what the impacts and implications are from the collapse of such large-scale land-based investments, and what lessons can in retrospect be derived from the experience of Bioshape in Kilwa. 


The report documents, insofar as is possible using available information, the process Bioshape and government authorities at national and district level undertook to acquire the land from the four villages in Kilwa where Bioshape established operations. 

Auteurs et éditeurs

Corporate Author(s): 

The Future Agricultures Consortium is an Africa-based alliance of research organisations seeking to provide timely, high-quality and independent information and advice to improve agricultural policy and practice in Africa.


Through a network of over 90 researchers across the region and around the world, we are showing how agricultural policy in Africa can help to reduce poverty and strengthen agricultural growth.


The Tanzania Natural Resource Forum seeks to improve governance and accountability in Tanzania’s natural resource sector to achieve more sustainable rural livelihoods and better conservation outcomes.  As a member-driven NGO, TNRF works to improve policy and practice for the better, by helping to bridge the gap between:


  • People’s local natural resource management needs and practices; and 
  • National natural resource management priorities, policies, laws and programs
Publisher(s): 

The Future Agricultures Consortium is an Africa-based alliance of research organisations seeking to provide timely, high-quality and independent information and advice to improve agricultural policy and practice in Africa.


Through a network of over 90 researchers across the region and around the world, we are showing how agricultural policy in Africa can help to reduce poverty and strengthen agricultural growth.


The Tanzania Natural Resource Forum seeks to improve governance and accountability in Tanzania’s natural resource sector to achieve more sustainable rural livelihoods and better conservation outcomes.  As a member-driven NGO, TNRF works to improve policy and practice for the better, by helping to bridge the gap between:


  • People’s local natural resource management needs and practices; and 
  • National natural resource management priorities, policies, laws and programs

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