eldis | Page 2 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
ELDIS

Eldis is an online information service providing free access to relevant, up-to-date and diverse research on international development issues. The database includes over 40,000 summaries and provides free links to full-text research and policy documents from over 8,000 publishers. Each document is selected by members of our editorial team.

To help you get the information you need we organise documents into collections according to key development themes and the country or regionthey relate to. You can browse these on the website or find out about our subscribe options to get updates in a format that suits you.

Who produces ELDIS?

Eldis is hosted by IDS but our service profiles work by a growing global network of research organisations and knowledge brokers including 3ie, IGIDR in India, Soul Beat Africa, and the Philippines Institute for Development Studies. 

These partners help to ensure that Eldis can present a truly global picture of development research. We make a special effort to cover high quality research from smaller research producers, especially those from developing countries, alongside that of the larger, northern based, research organisations.

Who uses ELDIS?

Our website is predominantly used by development practitioners, decision makers and researchers. Over half a million users visit the site every year and more than 50% of our regular visitors are based in developing countries.

But Eldis is not just a website. All of our content is Open Licensed so that it can be re-used by anyone that needs it. Website managers, applications developers and Open Data enthusiasts can all re-use Eldis content to enhance their own services or develop new tools. See our Get the Data page for more information.

eldis Resources

Exibindo 6 - 10 de 1156
Library Resource
Janeiro, 2017
Índia

Land in Meghalaya, India, was traditionally agricultural land, owned by the community. With increasing privatization and rising commercial value of land for non-agricultural use, many owners have sold the land for mining operations. So-called rat-hole coal mining has resulted in environmental degradation as well as in the loss of lives of miners, most of whom are from outside the state. The National Green Tribunal has banned coal mining until safer, more environmentally sound policies and practices are in place.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2017
Tanzânia

Land-use conflict is not a new phenomenon for pastoralists and farmers in Tanzania with murders, the killing of livestock and the loss of property as a consequence of this conflict featuring in the news for many years now. Various actors, including civil society organisations, have tried to address farmer-pastoralist conflict through mass education programmes, land-use planning, policy reforms and the development of community institutions. However, these efforts have not succeeded in the conflict.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2017
Etiópia

This study utilizes land registry data from the First and Second Stage Land Registration Reforms that took place in 1998 and 2016 in sampled districts and communities in Tigray region of Ethiopia. Tigray was the first region to implement low-cost land registration and certification in Ethiopia and providing household level land certificates in the names of household heads. Second Stage Land Registration and Certification (SSLRC) is scaled up since 2015 and provides households with parcel-based certificates with maps. The SSLR&C lists all holders of parcels by name and gender.

Library Resource
Artigos e Livros
Janeiro, 2017
Malawi

Many  African  countries  rely  on  sporadic  land  transfers  from customary to statutory domains to attract investment and improve agricultural performance. Data from 15,000 smallholders and 800 estates in Malawi allow exploring the long-term effects of such a strategy.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2017
África subsariana

This paper provides an overview of what we know about farm size distributions, the emerging land markets, the role of tenure systems, tenure reforms and land policies in shaping the distribution of increasingly scarce land resources. The primary focus is on Africa while making some comparisons with Asia. Climate risk and change have serious implications for household vulnerability and food security. While there is a need to absorb further population growth in rural areas, a rapid rise in rural-urban migration is inevitable.

Compartilhe esta página