Rural21 | Page 62 | Land Portal
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Acronym: 
Rural21

Location

Germany
DE

The international journal Rural 21 has dedicated more than 40 years to all topics surrounding rural development. Its ambition is to further those strategies and policies that strengthen rural areas of developing and newly industrialising countries and encourage their implementation. The journal addresses the complete range of relevant themes – from agriculture and fisheries via capacity building and education through to health and social security, energy supply and trade. Center-stage is always devoted to inquiring into how measures and strategies can contribute to global food security and to reducing poverty.



Rural 21 desires to further the dialogue between science and politics, the private sector, civil society and practitioners. Two platforms are designed for this purpose: Rural 21 in print is published four times a year, each issue highlighting a specific focus of rural development – this print edition is read in more than 150 countries. In parallel, Rural 21 online keeps the rural development community up to date on news and events, scientific findings and other print and online publications. 



Rural 21 is published by DLG-Verlag GmbH in Frankfurt/Germany. Financial partners are BMZ (German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development), GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit), DLG (German Agricultural Society – Deutsche Landwirtschaft-Gesellschaft), SDC (Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation) and Helvetas Swiss Intercooperation.



The first issue of Rural 21 dates back to 1968. From 1974 to 2007, the journal was published in three languages entitled "entwicklung & ländlicher raum" / "agriculture & rural development" / "agriculture & développement rural". In 2008, the journal was relaunched as "Rural 21".

Rural21 Resources

Displaying 306 - 310 of 319
Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
Global

A lot is expected of poverty reduction strategies, and high hopes have been placed in the Voluntary Guidelines on the right to food. One question frequently raised is whether it is possible to integrate the right to food into the established instrument of poverty reduction strategies.The present article discusses to what extent the two approaches can mesh to make a significant contribution to hunger reduction.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books

The tsunami disaster on 26 December 2004 claimed more than 200,000 lives. It triggered an unprecedented outpouring of reconstruction assistance from both private and public donors.The prompt provision of emergency relief averted the threat of epidemics and prevented major movements of refugees out of the affected regions. However,many of the reconstruction measures failed due to poor coordination between the actors involved and the lack of expertise underlying some of the interventions.The reconstruction effort was also very slow to get off the ground.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
Global

Following unanimous approval of the Voluntary Guidelines (VGs) on the Right to Adequate Food by FAO member states, with civil society's broad support, the question of «next steps» arises. To explore how to put this important new tool to use, the German government, with support from FAO and German NGOs, organized its fourth International Workshop on «Policies Against Hunger», held in June 2005 in Berlin.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
United States of America, Pakistan

2005 was a year of natural disasters.The impacts of the tsunami in the Indian Ocean, Hurricanes Katrina and Stan, and the Pakistan earthquake prompted calls for better disaster prevention and preparedness systems. Nature's power renders us impotent, but human actions and omissions are clearly worsening the impacts of disasters in some cases.This is where risk reducing measures must lock in, as the last fifteen years of international disaster risk management show.

Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
India

Life without liberty would result in some or the other form of slavery. Liberty cannot be there to a person having an empty stomach.The individual's right to life will have no meaning if the State fails to provide adequate food or food articles.The Indian Constitution provides «right to life» as a Fundamental
Right.That right is given a wide interpretation by the Supreme Court so as to include «right to food» so that democracy and full freedom can be achieved and slavery in any form is avoided.

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