Our blogs on Land | Land Portal

Discover hidden stories and unheard voices on land governance issues from around the world. This is where the Land Portal community shares activities, experiences, challenges and successes.

 

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Displaying 1 - 12 of 714
30 July 2021
Sub-Saharan Africa
Kenya

The Maasai community of Musul have lived on the same land in Laikipia county for generations. It is their source of food and water, the heart of their culture and beliefs, and their ancestral home. But until recently, their legal rights to govern it were tenuous.

30 July 2021
United States of America

As a child, Saturdays meant two things for Rhonda: trash and pizza. Her mother ardently believed in being ‘a good member of her community’ and was committed to teaching her children the same. “She’d wake us up Saturday mornings and say, ‘Come on! Let’s go pick up the trash! We’d say, ‘Booo!’ And then she’d say, ‘Well, I’m going to take you out for pizza after.’ And we’d say, ‘Yay!’” recalls Rhonda with a laugh. 

30 July 2021
Sierra Leone

It was good land. Before the company’s arrival in 2011, the people of Ngovokpahun village had used it to grow cocoa and other cash crops to help them pay for their children’s education. But when Italian Agriculture offered to build them a school, health center, and roads, provide them with employment, and pay rent, leasing out the land seemed like the wiser option. The company drafted the agreement and the landowners signed.

30 July 2021
Myanmar

No one asked them. No one even informed them. The first indicator the villagers had that something was happening in the Ar Yel Mountains was the arrival of men in construction hats.

At the beginning the disturbance was minimal; it was only one or two companies undertaking site explorations and tests. But by 2014, eight companies were “tearing the mountains apart” in their quest for manganese dioxide. That, said the villagers, was when the problems really began.

29 July 2021
Global

Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) Spoke with Namati about the power of a global environmental justice movement. You can find their Podcast Here and read the recap below.

 

27 July 2021
Authors: 
Eron Bloomgarden
Global
  • The climate crisis cannot be solved without ending tropical deforestation, which increased by 12% between 2019 and 2020.
  • A jurisdictional approach to forest protection enables governments to drive systemic change at a national level while supporting local and private efforts.
  • Here are five key reasons why this approach should be central to corporate climate strategies.
Law, Property and Disasters: Adaptive Perspectives from the Global South
27 July 2021
Authors: 
Prof. Daniel Fitzpatrick
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Indonesia
Philippines
Global

What is the role of land law in natural disasters? Are current global systems of land law fit-for-purpose as we experience escalating rates of climate disruption?

16 July 2021
Authors: 
Dr. Agnes M. Kalibata
Dr. Michael Taylor
Global

Our food systems are in urgent need of transformation, as humanity faces one of our biggest challenges yet; feeding a future population of 10 billion people with safe and nutritious food while keeping a healthy planet. Our food system has the power to tip the scales and transform the future of our planet and humankind.

To secure equal rights to land, bring men and women together
13 July 2021
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
Tanzania
Mongolia
Global

There is an underlying tension in the land rights movement that is rarely addressed head on, which is the perception that securing women’s land rights threatens community land rights. Community land rights are typically held by indigenous people, small-scale and subsistence farmers, pastoralists, herders and many other groups who are directly dependent on land for their livelihoods but whose land tenure is often the most precarious.

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