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Displaying 1 - 12 of 55
2 June 2020
Authors: 
Mr. Lorenzo Cotula
Niger
Sierra Leone
Colombia
Indonesia
Philippines
Global

Reports suggest the COVID-19 fallout is providing opportunities for elites to seize lands and rewrite regulations. We need effective responses to secure land rights and lay the foundations for a just recovery. 

 

28 May 2020
Authors: 
Prof. Tomaso Ferrando
Prof. Marcela Vecchione-Gonçalves
Latin America and the Caribbean
Brazil

Law Project 2.633/2020 is presented to the Brazilian Congress and may sign a point of no-return in the struggle for the Amazon and its socio-biodiversity

How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 April 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzania

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

31 March 2020
Authors: 
Emmanuel Mbise
Tanzania

As a Swahili speaker from Tanzania, I have not often had the opportunity to meet or work with people from remote Maasai communities. However, I recently visited the villages of Naisinyai and Mundarara in the north of the country as part of a global research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities affected by mining (the WOLTS project).

Strengthening Land Rights Will Curb Migration
24 September 2019
Authors: 
Chris Jochnick
Central America
Mexico
United States of America

What the US faces on its southern border is not a security problem, but a humanitarian crisis, and punishing attempts at deterrence cannot resolve it. Enabling people to stay where they are requires, first and foremost, strengthening their right to be there.

23 September 2019
Authors: 
Solina Kennedy
Global

A conversation with Julie Maldonado, Associate Director at Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network (LiKEN), and Co-Director of Rising Voices: Climate Resilience through Indigenous and Earth Sciences.

This is the second interview in our Climate Crisis, Global Land Use, and Human Rights Interview Series. See the first here.

Consent is Everybody’s Business: Why banks need to act on free, prior and informed consent
27 August 2019
Authors: 
Imke Greven
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Global

Banks must stand with Indigenous and local communities in respecting their land rights

In 2018, every week more than three people were murdered, defending their land and environment from destructive industries like mining, logging and agribusiness. These killings represent the extreme end of a spectrum of violence and threats directed at land rights defenders.

Pixabay
23 August 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Nathan Lobel
Global

The climate crisis will reshape our relationships to land around the world. Journalist David Wallace-Wells warns that, once the planet warms 2°C above preindustrial levels — the target set by the Paris Agreement — “major cities in the equatorial band of the planet will become unlivable,” and 400 million more people will suffer from regional water scarcity.

WomenDeliver2019_RRI
12 July 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Lindsay Bigda
Tanzania
Mexico
Global

Indigenous and local community women play crucial roles as household and forest managers, food providers, and leaders of rural enterprises—and make invaluable contributions toward global sustainable development and climate goals. The evidence is clear that securing their rights to community lands offers a promising path toward prosperity and sustainability in the forested and rural areas of the world. Yet these rights remain constrained by unjust laws and practices, and the voices of these women are consistently underrepresented in decision-making processes at all levels.

23 June 2019
Authors: 
Marcello De Maria
Stacey Zammit
Silvina Rusinek
Global

At this year' Global Landscape Forum (GLF 2019), one message was loud and clear: diversity is key to restoration and sustainable landscape management, more specifically the emphasis on a variety of viewpoints and stories, is what will help us reach our goals!

23 May 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Lindsay Bigda
Global

Across the globe, indigenous and rural women make invaluable contributions to their communities and toward global sustainable development and climate goals. They use, manage, and conserve the community territories that comprise over 50 percent of the world’s land and support up to 2.5 billion people. 

Harvesting sago along the Tuba River in Maluku province, Indonesia. Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/CIFOR.
25 January 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Peter Veit
Marlena Chertock
Katelyn Bredsnajder
Peru

Peruvian indigenous communities have shown themselves to be exceptional environmental and conservation leaders. Their leaders have worked for a decade to ensure a government commitment to conserve 54 million hectares of forest, as a part of the REDD+ program.

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Organizations

Our Mission

The Amazon Conservation Team partners with indigenous and other local communities to protect tropical forests and strengthen traditional culture.


Our Vision

We see a future where healthy tropical forests and thriving local communities exist in harmonious relationship with each other, contributing to the well-being of the planet.

The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) is a non-governmental Indigenous Peoples organisation in Guyana. It is primarily an advocacy organisation that seeks to promote and defend the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of Guyana. 

Membership of the APA is made up of Units throughout the country, currently amounting to close to eighty such units. The Association is led by an Executive Committee comprising the President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Assistant Secretary/Treasurer, thirteen regional representatives, a women’s representative and a youth representative. 

Anagrasar Samaj Unnyan Songstha (ASUS) was started on 1998 as a non profitable and non political voluntary organization to provide support to the Indigenous people of plain land in Bangladesh. It was established to promote rights of the Indigenous Community and their empowerment. It has strong experiences in group approach, community participation, training on different areas of development, mass awareness creation in the field of the land rights, child rights, labor rights, water & sanitation, health and hygiene, recovery of Indigenous culture.

The Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) is a regional organization founded in 1988 by indigenous peoples' movements. AIPP is committed to the cause of promoting and defending indigenous peoples' rights and human rights and articulating issues of relevance to indigenous peoples. At present, AIPP has 47 members from 14 countries in Asia with 14 National Formations, 15 Sub-national Formations and 18 Local Formations. Of this number, 6 are Indigenous Women's Organizations and 4 are Indigenous Youth Organizations.

AFRA Logo

AFRA is a land rights advocacy non-governmental organisation (NGO) working since 1979 to support marginalised black rural people, with a focus on farm dwellers. We are working towards an inclusive, gender equitable society where rights are valued, realised and protected, essential services are delivered, and land tenure is secure. We work intensively with communities in and around the uMgungundlovu District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and extensively in offering support and advice.

Both Ends

Together with environmental justice and human rights groups from poor and developing countries, Both ENDS works towards a sustainable, fair and inclusive world.

The vision of Both ENDS is a world where long-term environmental sustainability and social equity take priority over short-term profits.

Martinus Nijhoff Publishers was an independent academic publishing company dating back to the nineteenth century, which is now an imprint of Brill Publishers. Founded in 1683, Brill is a publishing house with a rich history and a strong international focus. The name was changed to Brill–Nijhoff. Brill is a prestigious imprint with its portfolio focuses on areas in Public International Law, Human Rights, Humanitarian Law and increasingly on International Relations. Brill publishes over 800 books per year in both print and electronic format.

BHRRC

We are 13 trustees and 58 staff dedicated to advancing human rights in business and eradicating abuse.  Our 18 Regional Researchers are based in Australia, Brazil, China, Colombia, Germany, India, Kenya, Jordan, Mexico, Myanmar, Philippines, Senegal, South Africa, Tunisia, UK, Ukraine, and the USA. They are supported by our two offices in London and New York. Oversight is provided by our board of trustees which consists of former business people, human rights, development, and environmental advocates and academics.

 

CCNDNuevoDia

CCCND trabaja junto con las comunidades Ch’orti en la región Nor-oriental de Guatemala. La organización provee apoyo legal y visibilidad a estas comunidades que enfrentan amenazas y violaciones a sus derechos humanos dada la implementación de proyectos hidroeléctricos y mineria en sus territorios.  Su trabajo a contribuido en la recuperación de identidad y gobernanza del territorio chòrti,  así como en la múltiples propuestas para desarrollo de política pública para el acceso a la tierra y la administración del territorio del pueblo Ch òrti`.

ccda_guatemala

The CCDA is an organization that fights for the improvement of the living conditions of the indigenous farmers by seeking a global change in the social, economic and political spheres, and for the respect of the cultures, ethnicity, language(s), traditions and territories of these peoples.

Community Development Association (CDA) is a highly secular, non-partisan-non-Government Development Organization (NGDO) established in the year 1985-1986 in North Western Part of  Bangladesh CDA gradually has been shifted its strategic position from charity to a Right based Organization now facilitating among the poorest, landless and marginal farmers along with the plain land indigenous people (IP) including the differently able men, women &youth with a view to empower, ensure and secure access to land Rights from its inception.

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